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New Hampshire state lawmaker switches support from Warren to Klobuchar

New Hampshire state lawmaker switches support from Warren to Klobuchar
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A New Hampshire state lawmaker has announced he is switching his support from Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren has expressed interest in being Biden's Treasury secretary: report The Democrats' 50 state strategy never reached rural America What a Biden administration should look like MORE (D-Mass.) to Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharFederal appeals court rules Minnesota must separate late-arriving mail-in ballots Trump announces intention to nominate two individuals to serve as FEC members Start focusing on veterans' health before they enlist MORE (D-Minn.) in the Democratic presidential primary race, arguing that Klobuchar is more "electable" than Warren across the country.

Democratic State Rep. Michael Pedersen told NBC News that his support had been shifting over the past couple weeks and that it solidified for Klobuchar after Tuesday night’s debate in Iowa, amid a growing feud between Warren and fellow progressive Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTlaib, Ocasio-Cortez offer bill to create national public banking system Cutting defense spending by 10 percent would debilitate America's military The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Election night could be a bit messy MORE (I-Vt.).

“After the debate, I saw everybody pairing up — Sen. Warren and Sanders competition against one another, and then everyone else. I just think those two as a team, Sanders and Warren, they don’t appeal widely across the nation as Sen. Klobuchar,” Pedersen told NBC. 

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He said that while he likes both Warren and Klobuchar and is friendly with staff on both campaigns, he views Klobuchar as having broader appeal across the country.

“I think that Sen. Klobuchar is more electable across the country than Sen. Warren,” Pedersen said. “She has a proven track record of winning in Trump country. And Sen. Warren has a proven track record of winning in liberal northeast.”

Klobuchar has touted her ability to win state-wide office in Minnesota, even in districts that have traditionally elected Republicans, in arguing she is best positioned to take on President TrumpDonald John TrumpStephen Miller: Trump to further crackdown on illegal immigration if he wins US records 97,000 new COVID-19 cases, shattering daily record Biden leads Trump by 8 points nationally: poll MORE.

In 2016, Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump may continue to campaign after Election Day if results are not finalized: report Hillicon Valley: Biden campaign slams Facebook after thousands of ads blocked | Majority of voters in three swing states saw ads on social media questioning election validity: poll | Harris more often the target of online misinformation Analysis: Where the swing states stand in Trump-Biden battle MORE carried Minnesota over Trump by a slim margin.

In addition to Pedersen, Klobuchar also picked up an endorsement from New Hampshire state Rep. Linn Opderbecke (D), who previously supported Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDemocratic senators unveil bill to ban discrimination in financial services industry Obama endorses Espy in Mississippi Senate race Durbin says he will run for No. 2 spot if Dems win Senate majority MORE (D) before the New Jersey senator ended his campaign earlier this week.

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“Amy showed on the debate stage that she’s someone who tells the truth and has people’s backs,” Opderbecke said in a statement to NBC. “That is the leadership we need to take on Donald Trump. Amy will not only beat Trump, but also will secure victories up and down the ballot. I’m proud to support her campaign for president.”

A spokesperson for the Klobuchar campaign was not immediately available for comment. 

The new endorsements come as Klobuchar looks to gain support in New Hampshire less than a month away from the Feb. 11 primary. The Granite State is the second state in the presidential nominating contest after the Feb. 3 Iowa caucuses.