Andrew Yang's wife, Evelyn Yang, calls for 'big structural change' at 4th annual Women's March

Andrew Yang's wife, Evelyn Yang, calls for 'big structural change' at 4th annual Women's March
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Evelyn Yang, wife of Democratic presidential candidate Andrew YangAndrew YangMajority of young Americans support universal basic income, public healthcare: poll Granting cash payments is a conservative principle Solving the coronavirus economic downturn — good psychology makes for good politics and policy MORE, called for "big structural change" during a speech at the 4th annual Women's March in New York City on Saturday.

"I'm so honored to be here with you all, roaring for justice, roaring for equality, roaring for peace and roaring for change," Evelyn Yang told those gathered.

Evelyn Yang, a former marketing executive who is now a stay-at-home mother, said that she "never imagined that I would be here in this context with my husband, Andrew Yang, running for president."

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Evelyn Yang said that when her husband, an entrepreneur, first announced his run for office, she thought it was just a phase. But she said she gave him her blessing when she saw how unhappy the country was after the 2016 election.

"Andrew is fighting for big structural change, putting power back into people's hands," Evelyn Yang said. "His message is humanity first, and his signature proposal is the Freedom Dividend," she added, referring to the candidate's proposal to give everyone $1,000 a month in universal basic income.

Evelyn Yang's remarks came as thousands of people turned out in New York City on Saturday and for separate marches across the country to attend the Women's March, a demonstration that began in 2017 following President Trump's inauguration.

The purpose of the movement is to elect more women to public office and to show their power at the polls. Thousands of volunteers and activists joined different strands of the movement, contributing to unprecedented wins for the Democratic Party by women of color in the 2018 midterms.

According to the Women's March website, organizers adhere to eight "Unity Principles": ending violence, protecting reproductive rights, LGBTQIA rights, worker's rights, civil rights, disability rights and immigrant rights and environmental justice.

Saturday's event in the nation's capital was expected to be the smallest one since Trump took office, The Washington Post reported, noting that cold and rainy weather would also likely depress turnout.