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Sanders says it's 'disappointing' he's not on campaign trail in Iowa

Sanders says it's 'disappointing' he's not on campaign trail in Iowa
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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden: 'Difficult decision' to staff administration with House, Senate members Hillicon Valley: YouTube suspends OANN amid lawmaker pressure | Dems probe Facebook, Twitter over Georgia runoff | FCC reaffirms ZTE's national security risk Biden Cabinet picks largely unify Democrats — so far MORE (I-Vt.) on Friday called it "disappointing" that he is not on the campaign trail in Iowa in the final weeks before the caucuses due to the ongoing impeachment trial.

“Obviously, when we were planning out our schedule, trust me, we were not expecting to be in Washington this week," Sanders said in an interview airing Friday on "CBS Evening News."

"We had set up a number of town meetings all over the state — we usually bring out good crowds — so it is disappointing to me to not be in Iowa talking to the people there,” he added.

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Sanders argued that the time puts him "at a disadvantage," acknowledging that others such as former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenMinnesota certifies Biden victory Trump tells allies he plans to pardon Michael Flynn: report Biden says staff has spoken with Fauci: 'He's been very, very helpful' MORE are still able to hit the campaign trail in the Hawkeye State.

Sanders is scheduled to attend a rally in Iowa on Saturday night and campaign in the state the next day after being forced to scrap a campaign event earlier this week due to the Senate trial against President TrumpDonald John TrumpMinnesota certifies Biden victory Trump tells allies he plans to pardon Michael Flynn: report Republican John James concedes in Michigan Senate race MORE.

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All 100 senators are required to be in Washington, D.C., during the day for six days a week during the trial, which kicked off in earnest on Tuesday. House impeachment managers making the case for removing Trump from office presented their arguments over the past three days, while White House lawyers are slated to offer their defense of the president starting Saturday and into next week.

Sanders is expected to appear at his rally in Ames on Saturday night alongside Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOcasio-Cortez, Cruz trade jabs over COVID-19 relief: People 'going hungry as you tweet from' vacation Biden Cabinet picks largely unify Democrats — so far New Consensus co-founder discusses proposal for Biden to use Fed to sidestep Congress MORE (D-N.Y.) and filmmaker Michael Moore. Ocasio-Cortez, Moore and Rep. Mark PocanMark William PocanCapitol's COVID-19 spike could be bad Thanksgiving preview Katherine Clark secures No. 4 leadership spot for House Democrats Democrats to determine leaders after disappointing election MORE (D-Wis.), a co-chairman of the Congressional Progressive Caucus who recently endorsed Sanders, are also slated to appear at a town hall for Sanders in Cedar Falls earlier in the day.

Three of Sanders's opponents in the Democratic primary — Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenBiden: 'Difficult decision' to staff administration with House, Senate members The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump OKs transition; Biden taps Treasury, State experience On The Money: Biden to nominate Yellen for Treasury secretary | 'COVID cliff' looms | Democrats face pressure to back smaller stimulus MORE (D-Mass), Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: YouTube suspends OANN amid lawmaker pressure | Dems probe Facebook, Twitter over Georgia runoff | FCC reaffirms ZTE's national security risk Democrats urge YouTube to remove election misinformation, step up efforts ahead of Georgia runoff YouTube temporarily suspends OANN account after spreading coronavirus misinformation MORE (D-Minn.) and Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetDemocratic senators urge Facebook to take action on anti-Muslim bigotry Hickenlooper ousts Gardner in Colorado, handing Democrats vital pickup Lobbying world MORE (D-Colo.) — are also sitting through the impeachment trial.

Sanders told reporters last week that he was concerned about missing key time on the campaign trail. When asked on Friday, Sanders said he believes this extra time gives several of his opponents an upper hand. 

“Politically, in the last week or so of the campaign? Yeah, I think it does," he said when asked if he thought the trial schedule benefitted Biden.

“He and others, not just Biden, are able to go out, talk to people, that’s really important."