Des Moines Register endorses Elizabeth Warren as Democratic presidential nominee

Des Moines Register endorses Elizabeth Warren as Democratic presidential nominee
© Greg Nash

The Des Moines Register editorial board endorsed Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren, Schumer introduce plan for next president to cancel ,000 in student debt The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Don't expect a government check anytime soon No new taxes for the ultra rich — fix bad tax policy instead MORE (D-Mass.) for the Democratic primary nomination on Saturday evening, just shy of a week before the first-in-the-nation caucuses in Iowa on Feb. 3. 

The endorsement comes just a week after the New York Times also endorsed Warren, along with her fellow Democratic primary challenger, Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharEPA delivers win for ethanol industry angered by waivers to refiners It's time for newspapers to stop endorsing presidential candidates Biden marks anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act, knocks Trump and McConnell MORE (Minn.). 

"The Des Moines Register editorial board endorses Elizabeth Warren in the 2020 Iowa Democratic caucuses as the best leader for these times" the board wrote, before touting her views on the economy and free markets. 

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"The senior U.S. senator from Massachusetts is not the radical some perceive her to be. She was a registered Republican until 1996. She is a capitalist. 'I love what markets can do,' she said. 'They are what make us rich, they are what create opportunity'" it continued. 

The board opined that the senator, "wants a government that works for people, not one corrupted by cash," the line also a main talking point for the Warren campaign. 

However, the board did not agree with all of the candidate's plans for "big structural change," alleging that they "go too far." 

"This board could not endorse the wholesale overhaul of corporate governance or cumulative levels of taxation she proposes. While the board has long supported single-payer health insurance, it believes a gradual transition is the more realistic approach. But Warren is pushing in the right direction." 

Despite that one "qualification," the news source also pointed to Warren’s career as a Harvard law professor and her work to break up big banks in the Senate. The piece also characterized Warren as a candidate who would work to defend the “working class," support Medicare-for-all and drive new policy to address climate change. 

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“Those ideas are not radical,” the editorial read. “They are right. They would improve life in America, and they are generally shared by the other Democratic candidates, who bring their own strengths to this race.”

The editorial also complimented each Democratic frontrunner, saying Biden would "restore credibility in the White House" and “much like Warren, Bernie SandersBernie SandersMcConnell accuses Democrats of sowing division by 'downplaying progress' on election security The Hill's Campaign Report: Arizona shifts towards Biden | Biden prepares for drive-in town hall | New Biden ad targets Latino voters Why Democrats must confront extreme left wing incitement to violence MORE champions the working class.”

At the end of the endorsement, the newspaper remarked on Warren's resolve, saying that, "Warren has proven that she is tough and fearless," and added that she has "seemingly endless energy" to fight for the people of America. 

Warren has often ranked in the top four candidates in the primary, trailing former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenCast of 'Parks and Rec' reunite for virtual town hall to address Wisconsin voters Biden says Trump should step down over coronavirus response Biden tells CNN town hall that he has benefited from white privilege MORE and fellow progressive Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.).

However, the Sanders campaign recently locked down a number of high-profile endorsements from the progressive wing of the Democratic Party, including Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezWhy Democrats must confront extreme left wing incitement to violence The Hill Interview: Jerry Brown on climate disasters, COVID-19 and Biden's 'Rooseveltian moment' House Democrats postpone vote on marijuana decriminalization bill MORE (D-N.Y.) and Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalDHS opens probe into allegations at Georgia ICE facility Progressive Caucus co-chair: Whistleblower complaint raises questions about 'entire detention system' Buttigieg, former officials added to Biden's transition team MORE (D-Wash.).

Sanders gained 7-point lead in Iowa ahead of the state's caucuses. A new poll released on Saturday showed Sanders at 25 percent support, followed by former Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBogeymen of the far left deserve a place in any Biden administration Overnight Defense: Woodward book causes new firestorm | Book says Trump lashed out at generals, told Woodward about secret weapons system | US withdrawing thousands of troops from Iraq A socially and environmentally just way to fight climate change MORE at 18 percent, Biden at 17 percent support and Warren at 15 percent. 

In 2016, the newspaper's editorial board endorsed Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillicon Valley: FBI chief says Russia is trying to interfere in election to undermine Biden | Treasury Dept. sanctions Iranian government-backed hackers The Hill's Campaign Report: Arizona shifts towards Biden | Biden prepares for drive-in town hall | New Biden ad targets Latino voters FBI chief says Russia is trying to interfere in election to undermine Biden MORE for the Democratic primary over Sanders. In the two elections before that, they endorsed Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioFlorida senators pushing to keep Daylight Savings Time during pandemic Hillicon Valley: DOJ indicts Chinese, Malaysian hackers accused of targeting over 100 organizations | GOP senators raise concerns over Oracle-TikTok deal | QAnon awareness jumps in new poll Intelligence chief says Congress will get some in-person election security briefings MORE (R-Florida) and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyGOP-led panel to hear from former official who said Burisma was not a factor in US policy Joe Biden's dangerous view of 'normalcy' The electoral reality that the media ignores MORE (R-Utah). 

Though the paper is in the center of the primary election, their endorsement has historically shown little correlation with the success of candidates in the caucuses.