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Biden: 'I sure would like Michelle to be the vice president'

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden: Trump 'continues to lie to us' about coronavirus Rally crowd chants 'lock him up' as Trump calls Biden family 'a criminal enterprise' Undecided voters in Arizona wary of Trump, crave stability MORE quipped Tuesday that he would “love” for former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump, Biden set for dueling town halls amid battleground blitz Obama to stump for Biden in final campaign stretch Celebs accept Michelle Obama's challenge to assemble a #VotingSquad MORE to serve as his own vice president.

At a campaign stop in Muscatine, Iowa, Biden was asked if he would consider appointing Obama to the Supreme Court.

“Yeah, I would, but I don’t think he’d do it,” Biden responded. “He’d be a great Supreme Court justice."  

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But the voter retorted back, “Second question is — which Obama?”

“Well I sure would like Michelle to be the vice president,” Biden said.

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Tuesday’s event is not the first time Biden has called on the recent Grammy Award winner, who remains hugely popular with voters, to serve as vice president. In a September 2019 appearance on "The Late Show," host Stephen Colbert questioned Biden as to whether he has “asked Michelle Obama for advice."

“Only to be my vice president,” Biden responded.

But he added, “I’m only joking. Michelle, I’m joking.” 

Michelle Obama and those close to her have repeatedly stated that she has no interest in running for office.

Biden has floated other women as potential running mates as well. In November, he identified former Deputy Attorney General Sally YatesSally Caroline YatesJudiciary Committee postpones hearing with McCabe on Russia probe This week: Senate kicks off Supreme Court fight Cindy McCain joins board of Biden's presidential transition team MORE, former gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams, and New Hampshire Sens. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenJustice indicts two members of ISIS 'Beatles' cell ISIS militants expected to be sent to US for prosecution: report New Hampshire poll finds Biden up 8 points over Trump MORE (D) and Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanHollywood gives Biden's digital campaign final star-studded push Democrats step up hardball tactics as Supreme Court fight heats up Congress needs to prioritize government digital service delivery MORE (D). 

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And last month, he told Axios that he would consider adding fellow presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenPush to expand Supreme Court faces Democratic buzzsaw Georgia senator mocks Harris's name before Trump rally: 'Kamala-mala-mala, I don't know' Warren, Porter to headline progressive fundraiser supporting seven swing state candidates MORE (D-Mass.) to the list.

Biden also jabbed President TrumpDonald John TrumpPolice say man dangling off Trump Tower Chicago demanding to speak with Trump Fauci says he was 'absolutely not' surprised Trump got coronavirus after Rose Garden event Biden: Trump 'continues to lie to us' about coronavirus MORE’s defense attorneys from his Senate impeachment trial at Tuesday's event. On Monday, Trump's team, defending him against charges of abusing his power in relations with Ukraine, argued before the Senate that Obama had abused his own power in his relationship with Russia.

“They’re both incredibly qualified people. I mean and such decent, honorable people. I found it strange yesterday that in that Republican presentation, they talked about maybe Obama should have been impeached,” Biden added.

According to a RealClearPolitics polling average, Biden is polling in second place behind Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersPush to expand Supreme Court faces Democratic buzzsaw Senate Democrats seek to alleviate public concern about some results not being available on election night Georgia senator mocks Harris's name before Trump rally: 'Kamala-mala-mala, I don't know' MORE (I-Vt.) in the Iowa caucuses, which are coming up on Monday. Sanders garnered an average of 25 percent support compared to Biden’s 22 percent.