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Biden: 'I sure would like Michelle to be the vice president'

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump grants clemency to more than 100 people, including Bannon Scalise bringing Donna Brazile as guest to Biden inauguration Sidney Powell withdraws 'kraken' lawsuit in Georgia MORE quipped Tuesday that he would “love” for former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaAshley Biden says Melania Trump has not reached out to Jill Biden Biden poised to be the most pro-immigrant president since Reagan Obama honors MLK Day: 'He never gave in to violence, never waved a traitorous flag' MORE to serve as his own vice president.

At a campaign stop in Muscatine, Iowa, Biden was asked if he would consider appointing Obama to the Supreme Court.

“Yeah, I would, but I don’t think he’d do it,” Biden responded. “He’d be a great Supreme Court justice."  

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But the voter retorted back, “Second question is — which Obama?”

“Well I sure would like Michelle to be the vice president,” Biden said.

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Tuesday’s event is not the first time Biden has called on the recent Grammy Award winner, who remains hugely popular with voters, to serve as vice president. In a September 2019 appearance on "The Late Show," host Stephen Colbert questioned Biden as to whether he has “asked Michelle Obama for advice."

“Only to be my vice president,” Biden responded.

But he added, “I’m only joking. Michelle, I’m joking.” 

Michelle Obama and those close to her have repeatedly stated that she has no interest in running for office.

Biden has floated other women as potential running mates as well. In November, he identified former Deputy Attorney General Sally YatesSally Caroline YatesThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Sights and sounds from chaotic downtown DC Biden to name Merrick Garland for attorney general Georgia keeps Senate agenda in limbo MORE, former gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams, and New Hampshire Sens. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenBipartisan group of senators: The election is over Seven Senate races to watch in 2022 How Congress dismissed women's empowerment MORE (D) and Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanBipartisan group of senators: The election is over Seven Senate races to watch in 2022 Insurers lose multiyear lobbying fight over surprise medical bills MORE (D). 

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And last month, he told Axios that he would consider adding fellow presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenBiden pick for Pentagon cruises through confirmation hearing Senate Democrats call on Biden to immediately invoke Defense Production Act Biden consumer bureau pick could take over agency on Inauguration Day MORE (D-Mass.) to the list.

Biden also jabbed President TrumpDonald TrumpLil Wayne gets 11th hour Trump pardon Trump grants clemency to more than 100 people, including Bannon Trump expected to pardon Bannon: reports MORE’s defense attorneys from his Senate impeachment trial at Tuesday's event. On Monday, Trump's team, defending him against charges of abusing his power in relations with Ukraine, argued before the Senate that Obama had abused his own power in his relationship with Russia.

“They’re both incredibly qualified people. I mean and such decent, honorable people. I found it strange yesterday that in that Republican presentation, they talked about maybe Obama should have been impeached,” Biden added.

According to a RealClearPolitics polling average, Biden is polling in second place behind Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Memo: Trump leaves changed nation in his wake Cori Bush dismisses concerns of being 'co-opted' by establishment The Memo: Biden prepares for sea of challenges MORE (I-Vt.) in the Iowa caucuses, which are coming up on Monday. Sanders garnered an average of 25 percent support compared to Biden’s 22 percent.