Biden: 'I sure would like Michelle to be the vice president'

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBriahna Joy Gray: White House thinks extending student loan pause is a 'bad look' Biden to meet with 11 Democratic lawmakers on DACA: report Former New York state Senate candidate charged in riot MORE quipped Tuesday that he would “love” for former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaMichelle Obama to Simone Biles: 'We are proud of you and we are rooting for you' Obama setting up big bash to celebrate his 60th Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary MORE to serve as his own vice president.

At a campaign stop in Muscatine, Iowa, Biden was asked if he would consider appointing Obama to the Supreme Court.

“Yeah, I would, but I don’t think he’d do it,” Biden responded. “He’d be a great Supreme Court justice."  

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But the voter retorted back, “Second question is — which Obama?”

“Well I sure would like Michelle to be the vice president,” Biden said.

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Tuesday’s event is not the first time Biden has called on the recent Grammy Award winner, who remains hugely popular with voters, to serve as vice president. In a September 2019 appearance on "The Late Show," host Stephen Colbert questioned Biden as to whether he has “asked Michelle Obama for advice."

“Only to be my vice president,” Biden responded.

But he added, “I’m only joking. Michelle, I’m joking.” 

Michelle Obama and those close to her have repeatedly stated that she has no interest in running for office.

Biden has floated other women as potential running mates as well. In November, he identified former Deputy Attorney General Sally YatesSally Caroline YatesSally Yates: I never thought that I'd be saying, 'Yeah, go Liz Cheney' ABC lands first one-on-one TV interview with Garland since confirmation Appointing a credible, non-partisan Jan. 6 commission should not be difficult MORE, former gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams, and New Hampshire Sens. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenEquilibrium/ Sustainability — Presented by NextEra Energy — Clean power repurposes dirty power CIA watchdog to review handling of 'Havana syndrome' cases Frustration builds as infrastructure talks drag MORE (D) and Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Officers recount the horror of Jan. 6 Trump says he'd like to see Chris Sununu challenge Hassan Poll: Potential Sununu-Hassan matchup in N.H. a dead heat  MORE (D). 

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And last month, he told Axios that he would consider adding fellow presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenPelosi disputes Biden's power to forgive student loans Warren hits the airwaves for Newsom ahead of recall election Human rights can't be a sacrificial lamb for climate action MORE (D-Mass.) to the list.

Biden also jabbed President TrumpDonald TrumpFormer New York state Senate candidate charged in riot Trump called acting attorney general almost daily to push election voter fraud claim: report GOP senator clashes with radio caller who wants identity of cop who shot Babbitt MORE’s defense attorneys from his Senate impeachment trial at Tuesday's event. On Monday, Trump's team, defending him against charges of abusing his power in relations with Ukraine, argued before the Senate that Obama had abused his own power in his relationship with Russia.

“They’re both incredibly qualified people. I mean and such decent, honorable people. I found it strange yesterday that in that Republican presentation, they talked about maybe Obama should have been impeached,” Biden added.

According to a RealClearPolitics polling average, Biden is polling in second place behind Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBriahna Joy Gray: White House thinks extending student loan pause is a 'bad look' Lawmakers can't reconcile weakening the SALT cap with progressive goals Human rights can't be a sacrificial lamb for climate action MORE (I-Vt.) in the Iowa caucuses, which are coming up on Monday. Sanders garnered an average of 25 percent support compared to Biden’s 22 percent.