Biden: 'I sure would like Michelle to be the vice president'

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenDonald Trump Jr. to self-publish book 'Liberal Privilege' before GOP convention Tom Price: Here's how we can obtain more affordable care The Memo: Democrats feel rising tide in Florida MORE quipped Tuesday that he would “love” for former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaPrinceton must finish what it started The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Justices rule Manhattan prosecutor, but not Congress, can have Trump tax records The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump takes on CDC over schools MORE to serve as his own vice president.

At a campaign stop in Muscatine, Iowa, Biden was asked if he would consider appointing Obama to the Supreme Court.

“Yeah, I would, but I don’t think he’d do it,” Biden responded. “He’d be a great Supreme Court justice."  

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But the voter retorted back, “Second question is — which Obama?”

“Well I sure would like Michelle to be the vice president,” Biden said.

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Tuesday’s event is not the first time Biden has called on the recent Grammy Award winner, who remains hugely popular with voters, to serve as vice president. In a September 2019 appearance on "The Late Show," host Stephen Colbert questioned Biden as to whether he has “asked Michelle Obama for advice."

“Only to be my vice president,” Biden responded.

But he added, “I’m only joking. Michelle, I’m joking.” 

Michelle Obama and those close to her have repeatedly stated that she has no interest in running for office.

Biden has floated other women as potential running mates as well. In November, he identified former Deputy Attorney General Sally YatesSally Caroline YatesHow conservative conspiracy theories are deepening America's political divide Showtime miniseries to feature Jeff Daniels as Comey, Brendan Gleeson as Trump Top FBI lawyer resigns MORE, former gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams, and New Hampshire Sens. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenRussian bounties revive Trump-GOP foreign policy divide Congress eyes tighter restrictions on next round of small business help Watchdog accuses Commerce of holding up 'Sharpiegate' probe report MORE (D) and Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanSenators press IRS chief on stimulus check pitfalls Hillicon Valley: Livestreaming service Twitch suspends Trump account | Reddit updates hate speech policy, bans subreddits including The_Donald | India bans TikTok Senators move to boost state and local cybersecurity as part of annual defense bill MORE (D). 

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And last month, he told Axios that he would consider adding fellow presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenTrump defends Roger Stone move: He was target of 'Witch Hunt' Democrats blast Trump for commuting Roger Stone: 'The most corrupt president in history' Pharma pricing is a problem, but antitrust isn't the (only) solution MORE (D-Mass.) to the list.

Biden also jabbed President TrumpDonald John TrumpDeSantis on Florida schools reopening: 'If you can do Walmart,' then 'we absolutely can do schools' NYT editorial board calls for the reopening of schools with help from federal government's 'checkbook' Mueller pens WaPo op-ed: Roger Stone 'remains a convicted felon, and rightly so' MORE’s defense attorneys from his Senate impeachment trial at Tuesday's event. On Monday, Trump's team, defending him against charges of abusing his power in relations with Ukraine, argued before the Senate that Obama had abused his own power in his relationship with Russia.

“They’re both incredibly qualified people. I mean and such decent, honorable people. I found it strange yesterday that in that Republican presentation, they talked about maybe Obama should have been impeached,” Biden added.

According to a RealClearPolitics polling average, Biden is polling in second place behind Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden wins Louisiana primary Oh, Canada: Should the US emulate Canada's National Health Service? Trump glosses over virus surge during Florida trip MORE (I-Vt.) in the Iowa caucuses, which are coming up on Monday. Sanders garnered an average of 25 percent support compared to Biden’s 22 percent.