Sanders endorses 9 progressive House candidates

Sanders endorses 9 progressive House candidates
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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersManchin meets with Sanders, Jayapal amid spending stalemate America can end poverty among its elderly citizens Senate GOP signals they'll help bail out Biden's Fed chair MORE (I-Vt.) endorsed nine additional progressive congressional lawmakers and candidates on Wednesday.

The endorsements cover a string of races across the country, from New York to Texas to California. None are in particularly tight races, and most of the recipients have backed Sanders’s presidential bid.

Sanders endorse two candidates and seven lawmakers. The candidates are Jessica Cisneros, who is running Texas's 28th District, and Georgette Gómez, who is running in California's 53rd District; the lawmakers are Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOvernight Energy & Environment — Presented by the American Petroleum Institute — Democrats address reports that clean energy program will be axed Democratic retirements could make a tough midterm year even worse Sinema's no Manchin, no McCain and no maverick MORE (N.Y.), Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaParis Hilton to visit Capitol Hill to advocate for bill on children's treatment centers Sunday shows preview: Supply chain crisis threaten holiday sales; uncertainty over whether US can sustain nationwide downward trend in COVID-19 cases Congress needs to step up on crypto, or Biden might crush it MORE (Calif.), Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarOvernight Energy & Environment — Presented by the American Petroleum Institute — Democrats address reports that clean energy program will be axed Is Wall Street serving its own interests by supporting China's? Democrats step up pressure on Biden on student loan forgiveness MORE (Minn.), Mark PocanMark William PocanProgressives say go big and make life hard for GOP Left doubles down on aggressive strategy Attacks on Sinema turn increasingly personal MORE (Wis.), Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyOvernight Health Care — Presented by The National Council for Mental Wellbeing — FDA panel advises Moderna booster shot for high-risk people Ilhan Omar to Biden: 'Deliver on your promise to cancel student debt' Biden's Red Queen justice: How he destroyed both the investigation and the reputation of border agents MORE (Mass.), Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibIlhan Omar to Biden: 'Deliver on your promise to cancel student debt' Who's the boss? Pelosi's legacy sealed after kowtowing to 'the Squad' Democratic civil war hits new heights MORE (Mich.) and Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchDemocrats weigh changes to drug pricing measure to win over moderates Schumer feels heat to get Manchin and Sinema on board Failed drug vote points to bigger challenges for Democrats MORE (Vt.).

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Sanders had previously announced his endorsements for Cori Bush in Missouri and Mari Newman in Illinois.

“This is the most important election in our lifetime and I’m proud there are so many candidates running for Congress who understand that real change comes from the bottom on up, not the top on down,” Sanders said in a statement. “They’re all strong advocates for real change and together we will build a movement to transform this nation so that it works for all our people.” 

Only Cisneros is in a primary against an incumbent. She has garnered the backing of several national progressive groups and is challenging Rep. Henry Cuellar (D-Texas), who won reelection in 2018 by nearly 70 percent over his Libertarian challenger. 

Most of the newest endorsees have back Sanders's presidential campaign, but not all — Pressley endorsed Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenAmerica can end poverty among its elderly citizens Senate GOP signals they'll help bail out Biden's Fed chair Misguided recusal rules lock valuable leaders out of the Pentagon MORE (D-Mass.), her home-state senator and Sanders’s chief progressive rival in the 2020 primary field. 

Warren also endorsed four progressive House candidates Tuesday.

Sanders has centered his White House bid around a “political revolution,” often noting on the campaign trail the necessity of boosting congressional support for plans that would work to reduce systemic inequalities and drastically expand social safety nets.