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Biden campaign starts 2020 with less cash on hand than top rivals

Biden campaign starts 2020 with less cash on hand than top rivals
© Greg Nash

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenRev. Barber says best way to undercut extremism is with honesty Biden requires international travelers to quarantine upon arrival to US Overnight Defense: House approves waiver for Biden's Pentagon nominee | Biden to seek five-year extension of key arms control pact with Russia | Two more US service members killed by COVID-19 MORE began 2020 with less cash on hand than his fellow top-tier Democratic presidential contenders, according to Federal Election Commission (FEC) filings for the fourth quarter. 

Biden ended the fourth quarter with $8.9 million cash on hand, the same amount he rounded out the third quarter with. 

The amount is considerably less than the cash on hand of the three other top-polling candidates.

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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersFormer Sanders spokesperson: Biden 'backing away' from 'populist offerings' Amanda Gorman captures national interest after inauguration performance Woman who made Sanders's mittens says she's sold out MORE (I-Vt.) rounded out the fourth quarter with $18.2 million cash on hand, while Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden's Interior Department temporarily blocks new drilling on public lands | Group of GOP senators seeks to block Biden moves on Paris, Keystone | Judge grants preliminary approval for 0M Flint water crisis settlement Senate approves waiver for Biden's Pentagon nominee House approves waiver for Biden's Pentagon nominee MORE (D-Mass.) ended the same period with around $13.7 million cash on hand. Former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBiden signs order to require masks on planes and public transportation Senators vet Buttigieg to run Transportation Department The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden hits the ground running on COVID MORE's campaign had $14.5 million cash on hand at the end of 2019. 

The latest FEC data comes just days before Monday's Iowa caucuses, where a number of polls show Biden and Sanders neck and neck. 

A Monmouth University poll released Wednesday showed 23 percent of likely caucusgoers saying Biden is their first choice, while 21 percent said Sanders was their top pick. 

Sanders's high spending numbers combined with his strong, four-year-old organization on the ground in Iowa could be cause for concern for the Biden campaign. 

However, Greg Schultz, Biden's campaign manager, assured supporters in a memo on Saturday that the campaign had the resources to successfully compete in the contests. 

"The month of January will be the campaign’s strongest month of fundraising since launch, with the vast majority of our growth coming through digital grassroots donations," Schultz wrote. "Elections ultimately are not about money, they’re about having the right message and vision for the country. But you have to have the resources to compete, which we unequivocally do."