SPONSORED:

Biden campaign starts 2020 with less cash on hand than top rivals

Biden campaign starts 2020 with less cash on hand than top rivals
© Greg Nash

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenFauci says school should be open 'full blast' five days a week in the fall Overnight Defense: Military sexual assault reform bill has votes to pass in Senate l First active duty service member arrested over Jan. 6 riot l Israeli troops attack Gaza Strip Immigration experts say GOP senators questioned DHS secretary with misleading chart MORE began 2020 with less cash on hand than his fellow top-tier Democratic presidential contenders, according to Federal Election Commission (FEC) filings for the fourth quarter. 

Biden ended the fourth quarter with $8.9 million cash on hand, the same amount he rounded out the third quarter with. 

The amount is considerably less than the cash on hand of the three other top-polling candidates.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersStudy: Early unemployment cutoff would cost 16M people 0B Machine Gun Kelly reveals how Bernie Sanders aided him in his relationship with Megan Fox Overnight Health Care: CDC approves Pfizer vaccine for adolescents aged 12-15 | House moderates signal concerns with Pelosi drug pricing bill | Panel blasts COVID-19 response MORE (I-Vt.) rounded out the fourth quarter with $18.2 million cash on hand, while Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren says Republican Party 'eating itself and it is discovering that the meal is poisonous' Briahna Joy Gray: Warren not endorsing Sanders in 2020 was 'really frustrating' McConnell hits Democratic critics of Israel MORE (D-Mass.) ended the same period with around $13.7 million cash on hand. Former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBiden says he and GOP both 'sincere about' seeking infrastructure compromise The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Colonial pays hackers as service is restored The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden expresses optimism on bipartisanship; Cheney ousted MORE's campaign had $14.5 million cash on hand at the end of 2019. 

The latest FEC data comes just days before Monday's Iowa caucuses, where a number of polls show Biden and Sanders neck and neck. 

A Monmouth University poll released Wednesday showed 23 percent of likely caucusgoers saying Biden is their first choice, while 21 percent said Sanders was their top pick. 

Sanders's high spending numbers combined with his strong, four-year-old organization on the ground in Iowa could be cause for concern for the Biden campaign. 

However, Greg Schultz, Biden's campaign manager, assured supporters in a memo on Saturday that the campaign had the resources to successfully compete in the contests. 

"The month of January will be the campaign’s strongest month of fundraising since launch, with the vast majority of our growth coming through digital grassroots donations," Schultz wrote. "Elections ultimately are not about money, they’re about having the right message and vision for the country. But you have to have the resources to compete, which we unequivocally do."