Poll: New Hampshire Democrats would prefer an extinction-causing meteor over Trump reelection

A majority of New Hampshire Democrats said in a new poll that they would rather a "giant meteor strikes the Earth, extinguishing all human life" than see President TrumpDonald John TrumpHR McMaster says president's policy to withdraw troops from Afghanistan is 'unwise' Cast of 'Parks and Rec' reunite for virtual town hall to address Wisconsin voters Biden says Trump should step down over coronavirus response MORE reelected.

The University of Massachusetts Lowell survey of 400 Democratic voters asked which candidates they would support in the state's primary Tuesday, with former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenCast of 'Parks and Rec' reunite for virtual town hall to address Wisconsin voters Biden says Trump should step down over coronavirus response Biden tells CNN town hall that he has benefited from white privilege MORE and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersMcConnell accuses Democrats of sowing division by 'downplaying progress' on election security The Hill's Campaign Report: Arizona shifts towards Biden | Biden prepares for drive-in town hall | New Biden ad targets Latino voters Why Democrats must confront extreme left wing incitement to violence MORE (I-Vt.) tying for first place at 23 percent support.

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But voters were also asked in the online survey conducted by YouGov: "Which of the following outcomes would you prefer occur on November 3, 2020? Donald Trump wins re-election or A giant meteor strikes the earth, extinguishing all human life."

Sixty-two percent of Democrats picked the meteor, while 38 percent chose a second term for Trump.

The viral Twitter account Sweet Meteor of Death, which fantasizes about the end of the world through a deadly meteor strike, praised the poll on Friday, writing "SMOD2020" or Sweet Meteor of Death 2020.

While the poll represents a small sampling of New Hampshire voters, it illustrates the degree of the party divide and contrasting feelings about Trump among Democrats.

The survey had an adjusted margin of error of 6.4 percent.