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Buttigieg after debate: I would be 'most progressive' nominee in party's history

Buttigieg after debate: I would be 'most progressive' nominee in party's history
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Former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegHigh-speed rail getting last minute push in Congress Buttigieg: Bipartisan deal on infrastructure 'strongly preferred' OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden ends infrastructure talks with key Republican | Colonial Pipeline CEO grilled over ransomware attack | Texas gov signs bills to improve power grid after winter storm MORE (D) vowed to be the "most progressive" Democratic nominee in a generation after he was attacked over his policies and record by progressives at Friday's debate.

In an interview with ABC News after the debate ended, Buttigieg said that despite criticism from rivals such as Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenProgressives rave over Harrison's start at DNC On The Money: Schumer to trigger reconciliation process on Wednesday | Four states emerge as test case for cutting off jobless benefits Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC MORE (D-Mass.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersProgressives rave over Harrison's start at DNC Zombie Tax punishes farmers to fill DC coffers Progressives threaten to block bipartisan infrastructure proposal MORE (I-Vt.), he would represent a significant shift to the left for the Democratic Party.

"Here's my message to progressives in the party: I would be the most progressive presidential nominee we've put forward in a generation. It's just that I've also found a way to put forward these issues that, we can bring more and more people on board with," he said.

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"We shouldn't measure the boldness of an idea by how many people it turns off, or how much controversy it generates," Buttigieg added. "We should measure by how many people we can bring in to do something big that makes a difference in our actual lives."

The remarks come as Buttigieg has faced criticism from progressives for refusing to endorse a "Medicare for All" plan that would eliminate private insurance. He also faced criticism on Friday over his record on racial issues as mayor of South Bend.