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Biden says Buttigieg is 'not a Barack Obama' on NH campaign trail

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenConfirmation hearing for Biden's DNI pick postponed Biden's Sunday inauguration rehearsal postponed due to security concerns: report Murkowski says it would be 'appropriate' to bar Trump from holding office again MORE went on the offensive against former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegAgency official says Capitol riot hit close to home for former Transportation secretary Chao Transportation Secretary Chao resigns in protest Buttigieg is blazing trails for LGBTQ equality MORE on Saturday, saying that he was more experienced than former mayor and that Buttigieg is "not a Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaBiden's chief aide says president wants teams, no rivals Where is the campus debate on immigration? Gerald Ford Foundation urges 'dignified' presidential transition MORE.”

Biden told a swath of voters on the campaign trail in New Hampshire that he was not a risky candidate to run against President TrumpDonald TrumpEx-Trump lawyer Cohen to pen forward for impeachment book Murkowski says it would be 'appropriate' to bar Trump from holding office again Man known as 'QAnon Shaman' asks Trump for pardon after storming Capitol MORE in the 2020 general election if he became the nominee.

The former vice president also pushed one of his main talking points that he's an experienced leader and lawmaker.

“I do not believe we’re a party at risk if I’m the nominee,” Biden said. “I do believe we’re a party at risk if we nominate someone who has never held a higher office than the mayor of South Bend, Indiana.”

In the past, the former mayor has tried to draw comparisons between himself and former President Barack Obama, as both Buttigieg and then-candidate Obama faced questions about their experience and ability to handle the rigors of the presidential office, according to The Associated Press

Referencing the mayor's Obama comparisons, Biden told reporters according to the wire service that, "This guy’s not a Barack Obama. Barack Obama had laid out a clear vision of what he thought the international society should look like and what the order should be. Barack Obama had laid out in detail what he thought should happen with regard to the economy.”

Biden's comments echo a new attack ad that his campaign rolled out on Saturday. The 90-second ad compares the records of both Biden and Buttigieg and focuses on the fact that the Buttigieg was the mayor of the small city of South Bend for eight years.

“Both Vice President Biden and former Mayor Buttigieg have taken on tough fights. Under threat of a nuclear Iran, Joe Biden helped to negotiate the Iran deal, and under the threat of disappearing pets, Buttigieg negotiated lighter licensing regulations on pet chip scanners,” the narrator in the ad says.

“Both Vice President Biden and former Mayor Pete have helped shape our economy. Joe Biden helped save the auto industry, which revitalized the economy of the Midwest, and led the passage and the implementation of the Recovery Act, saving our economy from a depression,” she adds.

“Pete Buttigieg revitalized the sidewalks of downtown South Bend by laying out decorative brick.” 

In response, Chris Meagher, Buttigieg's national press secretary, said in a statement: "The Vice President’s decision to run this ad speaks more to where he currently stands in this race than it does about Pete’s perspective as a mayor and veteran."

The offensive strategy from the Biden campaign comes as the former vice president looks to rebound in New Hampshire's primary after struggling to a fourth place finish in the Iowa caucuses.
 
In Iowa, Buttigieg virtually tied with Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden to seek minimum wage in COVID-19 proposal Former Sanders spokesperson: Progressives 'shouldn't lose sight' of struggling Americans during pandemic 'I saw my life flash before my eyes': An oral history of the Capitol attack MORE (I-Vt.) with 100 percent of results in, and polls this week have shown the two leading the Democratic primary pack ahead of Tuesday's New Hampshire nominating race.