Andrew Yang ends presidential bid

NASHUA, N.H. — Businessman Andrew YangAndrew YangYang says he has left Democratic Party Yang says presidential bid 'messed with my head' Yang in new book: Trump might have won in 2020 'if not for the coronavirus' MORE suspended his presidential campaign on Tuesday after a meteoric rise that saw him outlast several other higher-profile Democratic candidates.

"While there is great work yet to be done, you know I am the math guy," Yang told supporters on Tuesday. "It is clear tonight from the numbers that we are not going to win this race.”

"I am not someone who wants to accept donations and support in a race we will not win," he continued. 

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"And so tonight, I am announcing I am suspending my campaign for president," he said to audible disappointment among his supporters, with one yelling, "We love you, Andrew." 

Yang thanked his supporters in a tweet on Tuesday before it was revealed that he was dropping out. 

Yang defied expectations throughout the campaign, climbing into the race’s mid-tier in the second half of 2019.

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The tech entrepreneur outlasted sitting senators and governors in the race, including Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisHarris to campaign with McAuliffe in Virginia Harris to highlight drought, climate change in Nevada trip Senate GOP signals they'll help bail out Biden's Fed chair MORE (D-Calif.) and Cory BookerCory BookerSenate GOP signals they'll help bail out Biden's Fed chair Defense & National Security — Military starts giving guidance on COVID-19 vaccine refusals Senators preview bill to stop tech giants from prioritizing their own products MORE (D-N.J.) and Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeNick Rolovich fired as coach at Washington State after refusing vaccine under state mandate Washington state ferry system scaling back services amid staffing shortages Newsom signs bill requiring California public schools to provide menstrual products MORE (D). 

Yang gained national exposure on the race’s debate stages, making every debate stage except the Des Moines, Iowa, debate in January. 

Yang frequently used his time on the debate stage to tout his universal basic income platform, which he called the Freedom Dividend. 

The presidential candidate launched the Freedom Dividend Pilot Program in September, in which at least 10 American families will receive $1,000 a month, or $12,000 a year.

“This is how we will get our country working for us again — the American people,” Yang said during the September debate where he announced the program. 

Updated at 8:38 p.m.