Michael Bennet ends presidential bid

Michael Bennet ends presidential bid

Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetHillicon Valley: Facebook considers political ad ban | Senators raise concerns over civil rights audit | Amazon reverses on telling workers to delete TikTok Senators raise concerns over Facebook's civil rights audit House Democrats chart course to 'solving the climate crisis' by 2050 MORE (D-Colo.) ended his bid for the Democratic presidential nomination on Tuesday after early returns in the New Hampshire primary showed him with less than 1 percent of the vote in the Granite State. 

Bennet launched his campaign last spring but struggled to gain traction in the crowded primary field. He largely punted on a campaign in Iowa, the first-in-the-nation caucus state, opting instead to compete in New Hampshire. 

But even there he never struck a chord with voters. As primary returns in the state were counted on Tuesday night, they showed Bennet lagging far behind the field’s top-tier candidates.

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Bennet pursued the moderate lane in the primary, warning against backing a candidate who would push the Democratic Party too far to the left. On the other hand, he pitched himself as an escape from the chaos and drama of the Trump administration.

“If you elect me president, I promise you won’t have to think about me for two weeks at a time,” he tweeted last summer.

But in a crowded primary field with high-profile candidates such as Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden wins Louisiana primary Oh, Canada: Should the US emulate Canada's National Health Service? Trump glosses over virus surge during Florida trip MORE (I-Vt.) and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenDonald Trump Jr. to self-publish book 'Liberal Privilege' before GOP convention Tom Price: Here's how we can obtain more affordable care The Memo: Democrats feel rising tide in Florida MORE, Bennet ultimately failed to resonate with Democratic primary voters nervously in search of a nominee capable of defeating Trump in November.

Bennet was the second candidate to end his presidential bid Tuesday night. His announcement came less than an hour after another hopeful, former tech executive Andrew YangAndrew YangBiden campaign to take over 'Supernatural' star's Instagram for interview Hillicon Valley: Justice Department announces superseding indictment against WikiLeaks' Assange | Facebook ad boycott gains momentum | FBI sees spike in coronavirus-related cyber threats | Boston city government bans facial recognition technology The Hill's Campaign Report: Progressives feel momentum after primary night MORE, suspended his campaign.