Biden assures supporters the primary is still 'wide open' in lengthy phone call: report

Biden assures supporters the primary is still 'wide open' in lengthy phone call: report

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump hails Arizona Senate for audit at Phoenix rally, slams governor Republicans focus tax hike opposition on capital gains change Biden on hecklers: 'This is not a Trump rally. Let 'em holler' MORE reportedly sought to reassure supporters Wednesday after his performance trailing several candidates in the first two nominating states. 

“I'll be damned if we're gonna lose this nomination, particularly if we're gonna lose this nomination and end up losing an election to Donald TrumpDonald TrumpTrump hails Arizona Senate for audit at Phoenix rally, slams governor Arkansas governor says it's 'disappointing' vaccinations have become 'political' Watch live: Trump attends rally in Phoenix MORE,” Biden said in a roughly 13-minute call to supporters, Politico reported Wednesday.

Biden reportedly said the field is “still wide open” and that he is “confident” he can win in South Carolina and Nevada, the next two states to hold primaries and caucuses. 

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"The point is that, I want you to know that things haven't changed in terms of responses we're getting, in terms of whether it's contributions online or whether it's endorsements since both of those primaries have taken place," he said, adding that he raised more than $4 million online in the first 11 days of this month. 

He also said he raised $453,000 online on Tuesday, the day of the New Hampshire primary, according to Politico. 

“So my point is that we've not seen any diminution in the energy or in endorsements,” he said.

On the call, he also reportedly said it will be “fairly hard” for candidates like former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegJD Vance takes aim at culture wars, childless politicians Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary The Hill's Morning Report - High-profile COVID-19 infections spark new worries MORE and Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharBiden signals tough stance on tech with antitrust picks Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill to hold platforms accountable for misinformation during health crises | Website outages hit Olympics, Amazon and major banks Competition laws could be a death knell for startup mergers and acquisitions MORE (D-Minn.) to “go South.”

Both Buttigieg and Klobuchar performed better than Biden in New Hampshire, as did Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersPoll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Overnight Defense: US launches another airstrike in Somalia | Amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to NDAA | No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia US launches second Somalia strike in week MORE (I-Vt.) who won the first-in-the-state primary. 

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Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenKavanaugh conspiracy? Demands to reopen investigation ignore both facts and the law Biden signals tough stance on tech with antitrust picks Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary MORE (D-Mass.) also had a narrow lead over Biden, pushing the former vice president into fifth place, but neither Warren nor Biden received delegates from New Hampshire. 

Biden is now pushing South Carolina, the first primary state with a significant black population, as a strong point for his campaign. A RealClearPolitics average of polls shows Biden leading in the state with 31 percent, followed by businessman Tom SteyerTom SteyerOvernight Energy: 'Eye of fire,' Exxon lobbyist's comments fuel renewed attacks on oil industry | Celebrities push Biden to oppose controversial Minnesota pipeline | More than 75 companies ask Congress to pass clean electricity standard Celebrities push Biden to oppose controversial Minnesota pipeline Six things to watch as California heads for recall election MORE at 18.5 percent and Sanders at 17 percent. 

A spokesperson for Biden’s campaign was not immediately available for comment.