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Klobuchar says English should not be US national language, reversing from prior vote

Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharSenate Democrats seek to alleviate public concern about some results not being available on election night Washington flooded with Women's March protesters ahead of Barrett confirmation vote Supreme Court battle turns into 2020 proxy war MORE (D-Minn.) says that English should not be the official language of the U.S., a reversal from a vote she cast more than a decade ago.

At a campaign event in Las Vegas on Friday, Klobuchar said she has now “taken a strong position against” the English-language amendment, which she voted for in 2007, according to The Associated Press.

Klobuchar was one of 17 Senate Democrats to vote for the amendment, which would have reversed an executive order by former President Clinton that required government materials to be provided in languages other than English.

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Her shift on the issue comes a week before the Democratic caucuses in Nevada, which has a significant Latino population and where she polls at about 10 percent support.

“I think that when you look at a state like this state, and a country like ours that is so diverse, you don’t want to have that provision in law because then it would be very difficult to have, say, government documents and other things translated into other languages,” she said Friday, according to the AP. “So that is not a position I take. I did vote that way, but way back then, along with many other people.”

Klobuchar is competing with former South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegButtigieg says it's time to 'turn the page' on Trump administration Sunday shows preview: Coronavirus cases surge in the Midwest; Trump hits campaign trail after COVID-19 Biden town hall questioner worked as speechwriter in Obama administration: report MORE and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenNearly 300 former national security officials sign Biden endorsement letter Trump narrows Biden's lead in Pennsylvania: poll Florida breaks first-day early voting record with 350K ballots cast MORE for support from moderate voters in the Democratic race following her third-place finish in the New Hampshire primary earlier this week.

On Thursday, Klobuchar received subtle criticism from Buttigieg, who, without mentioning her, pointed out that "some of those same voices" from Washington who criticize his campaign also voted to confirm former U.S. Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Kevin McAleenan, who presided over family separation policies at the U.S.-Mexico border. 

Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Goldman Sachs - Tipping point week for Trump, Biden, Congress, voters Biden and Schumer face battles with left if Democrats win big Push to expand Supreme Court faces Democratic buzzsaw MORE (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOvernight Health Care: Trump takes criticism of Fauci to a new level | GOP Health Committee chairman defends Fauci | Birx confronted Pence about Atlas Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing Government watchdog to investigate allegations of Trump interference at CDC, FDA MORE (D-Mass.) — the only other senators still in the race — did not vote to confirm McAleenan.

Klobuchar responded by telling the AP she “vehemently” disagrees with Trump’s immigration policies while noting that McAleenan was recommended by former Obama administration officials and other Democrats. 

The Klobuchar campaign did not immediately respond to an inquiry from The Hill.