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Harry Reid: 'People should not be counting Joe Biden out of the race yet'

Harry Reid: 'People should not be counting Joe Biden out of the race yet'

Former Sen. Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidHarry Reid: Biden should give GOP three weeks to see if they will work with him Democrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Durbin says he will run for No. 2 spot if Dems win Senate majority MORE (D-Nev.) said that Joe BidenJoe BidenObama slams Trump in Miami: 'Florida Man wouldn't even do this stuff' Trump makes his case in North Carolina, Ohio and Wisconsin Brad Pitt narrates Biden ad airing during World Series MORE should not be counted out of the 2020 White House race, despite his weak showings in the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary, predicting the former vice president would do well in more diverse states.

“Iowa and New Hampshire are not representative of the country. He’s going to do well in Nevada, he’s going to do extremely well in South Carolina. So, people should not be counting Joe Biden out of the race yet,” Reid, who still wields considerable influence in Nevada after his 2016 retirement, told The Associated Press.

Reid also said numerous candidates had reached out to him for advice, but would not say whether he had advised any to drop out.

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“The only advice I give anyone is if they call me, I’m as candid with them as I can be. And I don’t always tell them what they want to hear,” Reid said.

Reid cautioned against writing any candidates off based on any one-time snapshot of the race, citing Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharStart focusing on veterans' health before they enlist Durbin says he will run for No. 2 spot if Dems win Senate majority Democrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein MORE’s (D-Minn.) third-place finish in New Hampshire after two strong debate performances.

“People kept saying, ‘Why is she in the race?’” Reid noted.

Reid, who has not made an endorsement in the race, said it was doubtful that the Democratic Party would nominate a candidate at a brokered convention, with no candidate going into the convention with the required majority of delegates.

The former Senate majority leader also offered praise for former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergThe Hill's Campaign Report: 2020 spending wars | Biden looks to clean up oil comments | Debate ratings are in Biden breaks all-time television spending record Trump squeezed by cash crunch in final election sprint MORE, who is skipping the Nevada caucuses to concentrate on Super Tuesday states.

“He was a good mayor. No one in the country—no one—has done more on guns and climate than Mayor Bloomberg. So I like Mayor Bloomberg a great deal,” Reid told the AP.