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Bloomberg has spent $124M on ads in Super Tuesday states

Bloomberg has spent $124M on ads in Super Tuesday states
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Former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergFour years is not enough — Congress should make the child tax credit permanent Biden's spending plans: Good PR, but bad politics and policy Top 12 political donors accounted for almost 1 of every 13 dollars raised since 2009: study MORE has reportedly spent more than $124 million in advertising across 14 states as he prepares a major push in states voting on Super Tuesday.

The Los Angeles Times reported Monday that the spending by the billionaire candidate has already eclipsed that of both his fellow Democratic primary contenders and President TrumpDonald TrumpThe Memo: The Obamas unbound, on race Iran says onus is on US to rejoin nuclear deal on third anniversary of withdrawal Assaults on Roe v Wade increasing MORE.

Super Tuesday on March 3 is expected to be a decisive moment for the 2020 Democratic primary, as more than 1,300 of the 1,991 delegates required to win the Democratic nomination will be up for grabs that day.

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“It’s on steroids,” one field organizer for Bloomberg's campaign in Colorado told the Los Angeles Times. “I’ve never seen anything like it.”

The heavy ad spending has been sharply criticized by Democratic rivals such as Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersGOP is consumed by Trump conspiracy theories Manchin on collision course with Warren, Sanders Sanders on Cheney drama: GOP is an 'anti-democratic cult' MORE (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenFree Speech Inc.: The Democratic Party finds a new but shaky faith in corporate free speech Debate over ICBMs: Will 'defund our defenses' be next? Manchin on collision course with Warren, Sanders MORE (D-Mass.), who have argued that the billionaire is attempting to buy his way to the Democratic nomination.

"Hey guys, how do you buy the presidency? Well, you buy the presidency, at least he's going to try to buy the presidency, by spending hundreds and hundreds of millions of dollars on TV ads," Sanders said during a recent campaign appearance in Nevada, a state where Bloomberg will not be on the ballot in Saturday's caucuses. "I didn't see Mike in Iowa ... I didn't see Mike in New Hampshire. ... Hey, you know what? I didn't see him here in Nevada!"

"Well, I got news for Mr. Bloomberg, and that is the American people are sick and tired of billionaires buying elections," Sanders said.