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Bloomberg has spent $124M on ads in Super Tuesday states

Bloomberg has spent $124M on ads in Super Tuesday states
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Former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergEverytown calls on Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene to resign Biden selects Gina Raimondo for Commerce chief: reports 7 surprise moments from a tumultuous year in politics MORE has reportedly spent more than $124 million in advertising across 14 states as he prepares a major push in states voting on Super Tuesday.

The Los Angeles Times reported Monday that the spending by the billionaire candidate has already eclipsed that of both his fellow Democratic primary contenders and President TrumpDonald TrumpSchumer: Impeachment trial will be quick, doesn't need a lot of witnesses Nurse to be tapped by Biden as acting surgeon general: report Schumer calls for Biden to declare climate emergency MORE.

Super Tuesday on March 3 is expected to be a decisive moment for the 2020 Democratic primary, as more than 1,300 of the 1,991 delegates required to win the Democratic nomination will be up for grabs that day.

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“It’s on steroids,” one field organizer for Bloomberg's campaign in Colorado told the Los Angeles Times. “I’ve never seen anything like it.”

The heavy ad spending has been sharply criticized by Democratic rivals such as Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTim Ryan says he's 'looking seriously' at running for Portman's Senate seat Bernie Sanders has been most-followed member of Congress on social media for six years This week: Senate stuck in limbo MORE (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenTim Ryan says he's 'looking seriously' at running for Portman's Senate seat Leahy, not Roberts, to preside over impeachment trial Skepticism reigns as Biden, McConnell begin new era MORE (D-Mass.), who have argued that the billionaire is attempting to buy his way to the Democratic nomination.

"Hey guys, how do you buy the presidency? Well, you buy the presidency, at least he's going to try to buy the presidency, by spending hundreds and hundreds of millions of dollars on TV ads," Sanders said during a recent campaign appearance in Nevada, a state where Bloomberg will not be on the ballot in Saturday's caucuses. "I didn't see Mike in Iowa ... I didn't see Mike in New Hampshire. ... Hey, you know what? I didn't see him here in Nevada!"

"Well, I got news for Mr. Bloomberg, and that is the American people are sick and tired of billionaires buying elections," Sanders said.