Bloomberg has spent $124M on ads in Super Tuesday states

Bloomberg has spent $124M on ads in Super Tuesday states
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Former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergTrump, Biden have one debate goal: Don't lose Bloomberg rolls out M ad buy to boost Biden in Florida Democratic groups using Bloomberg money to launch M in Spanish language ads in Florida MORE has reportedly spent more than $124 million in advertising across 14 states as he prepares a major push in states voting on Super Tuesday.

The Los Angeles Times reported Monday that the spending by the billionaire candidate has already eclipsed that of both his fellow Democratic primary contenders and President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew Biden campaign ad jabs at Trump's reported 0 income tax payments Ocasio-Cortez: Trump contributed less in taxes 'than waitresses and undocumented immigrants' Third judge orders Postal Service to halt delivery cuts MORE.

Super Tuesday on March 3 is expected to be a decisive moment for the 2020 Democratic primary, as more than 1,300 of the 1,991 delegates required to win the Democratic nomination will be up for grabs that day.

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“It’s on steroids,” one field organizer for Bloomberg's campaign in Colorado told the Los Angeles Times. “I’ve never seen anything like it.”

The heavy ad spending has been sharply criticized by Democratic rivals such as Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersNew Biden campaign ad jabs at Trump's reported 0 income tax payments Trump, Biden have one debate goal: Don't lose The role (un)happiness plays in how people vote MORE (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenNew Biden campaign ad jabs at Trump's reported 0 income tax payments Democrats blast Trump after report reveals he avoided income taxes for 10 years: 'Disgusting' Overnight Defense: Appeals court revives House lawsuit against military funding for border wall | Dems push for limits on transferring military gear to police | Lawmakers ask for IG probe into Pentagon's use of COVID-19 funds MORE (D-Mass.), who have argued that the billionaire is attempting to buy his way to the Democratic nomination.

"Hey guys, how do you buy the presidency? Well, you buy the presidency, at least he's going to try to buy the presidency, by spending hundreds and hundreds of millions of dollars on TV ads," Sanders said during a recent campaign appearance in Nevada, a state where Bloomberg will not be on the ballot in Saturday's caucuses. "I didn't see Mike in Iowa ... I didn't see Mike in New Hampshire. ... Hey, you know what? I didn't see him here in Nevada!"

"Well, I got news for Mr. Bloomberg, and that is the American people are sick and tired of billionaires buying elections," Sanders said.