Democratic Senate campaign arm raised more than $8.5 million in January

Democratic Senate campaign arm raised more than $8.5 million in January
© Greg Nash

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised more than $8.5 million in January, according to figures shared first with The Hill, making it the group’s most prolific month of fundraising of the 2020 cycle to date.

The committee, which works to get Democrats elected to the Senate, ended the month with $19.75 million in cash on hand, according to a DSCC official.

More than 50 percent of the group’s January fundraising haul came from grassroots donations, with an average contribution size of less than $25.

ADVERTISEMENT

The committee official said that individual online contributions to the committee were up sharply — about 62 percent — from January 2018, ahead of that year’s midterm elections. 

"Our grassroots supporters are chipping in online, on the phones, and in the mail to ensure Democrats flip the Senate in 2020," said Scott Fairchild, the executive director of the DSCC. "We’re continuing to break committee records and raise the resources we need to take advantage of a map that keeps moving in our direction."

The fundraising boost suggests that the DSCC saw contributions pour in even as Democrats in the Senate moved to convict President TrumpDonald John TrumpCuomo grilled by brother about running for president: 'No. no' Maxine Waters unleashes over Trump COVID-19 response: 'Stop congratulating yourself! You're a failure' Meadows resigns from Congress, heads to White House MORE in an impeachment trial centered around his efforts to pressure Ukrainian officials to announce investigations that could have benefited him politically.

That trial ultimately ended with Trump’s acquittal. Only one Republican in the GOP-controlled Senate, Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyGranting cash payments is a conservative principle 7 things to know about the coronavirus stimulus package Scarborough rips Trump for mocking Romney's negative coronavirus test: 'Could have been a death sentence' MORE (R-Utah), voted to convict Trump on the accusation that he abused his power.

Democrats are playing offense this year in Senate races after largely finding themselves on defense in 2018, when they were forced to fend off challenges in two dozen seats across the country. 

This year, however, the GOP is defending 23 seats, and Democrats are eyeing a handful as potential pick-up opportunities. Their targets include Republican Sens. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerRomney says he tested negative for coronavirus, will remain in quarantine Senate GOP super PAC books more than million in fall ads The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Airbnb - Markets expected to plunge amid partisan squabbling MORE (Colo.), Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyNew bill would withhold pay from Senate until coronavirus stimulus package passes Senate GOP super PAC books more than million in fall ads Politics and the pandemic — Republicans are rightly worried MORE (Ariz.), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisCampaigns pivot toward health awareness as races sidelined by coronavirus Senate leaving DC until April 20 after coronavirus stimulus vote Senate GOP super PAC books more than million in fall ads MORE (N.C.) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGOP presses for swift Ratcliffe confirmation to intel post Campaigns pivot toward health awareness as races sidelined by coronavirus Senate eyes quick exit after vote on coronavirus stimulus package MORE (Maine.), among others.

The National Republican Senatorial Committee hasn’t yet unveiled its January fundraising total, but the group ended 2019 with a slight cash advantage over its Democratic counterpart.