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Buttigieg and Biden haven't invested in any ads in the crucial Super Tuesday states: WSJ analysis

Buttigieg and Biden haven't invested in any ads in the crucial Super Tuesday states: WSJ analysis

Former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBiden dispatches Cabinet members to sell infrastructure plan Watch live: Biden Cabinet officials testify on infrastructure plan Biden looks to bolster long-term research and development MORE and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden overruled Blinken, top officials on initial refugee cap decision: report Suicide bombing hits Afghan security forces Jim Jordan, Val Demings get in shouting match about police during hearing MORE have yet to spend any money on ads in Super Tuesday states as the important March 3 date grows closer. 

According to ad tracker Kantar/CMAG, the only candidates that have spent sizable amounts of ad money in Super Tuesday states are Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersNewsmax host: Jury decided to 'sacrifice' Chauvin to the mob Lawmakers react to guilty verdict in Chauvin murder trial: 'Our work is far from done' Senate confirms SEC chief Gensler to full five-year term MORE (I-Vt.) and billionaires Michael BloombergMichael BloombergTop 12 political donors accounted for almost 1 of every 13 dollars raised since 2009: study Holder, Yates lead letter backing Biden pick for Civil Rights Division at DOJ The truth behind companies' 'net zero' climate commitments MORE and Tom SteyerTom SteyerTop 12 political donors accounted for almost 1 of every 13 dollars raised since 2009: study California Democrats weigh their recall options Why we should be leery of companies entering political fray MORE.

Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharBig Tech set to defend app stores in antitrust hearing Jimmy Carter remembers Mondale as 'best vice president in our country's history' Hillicon Valley: Apple approves Parler's return to App Store | White House scales back response to SolarWinds, Microsoft incidents | Pressure mounts on DHS over relationship with Clearview AI MORE (D-Minn.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenLawmakers react to guilty verdict in Chauvin murder trial: 'Our work is far from done' World passes 3 million coronavirus deaths Poll: 56 percent say wealth tax is part of solution to inequality MORE (D-Mass.) have spent some money on advertising in the 14 states, though the sum of their spending combined is less than $2 million, The Wall Street Journal reports.

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Sanders has paid for $11 million worth of ads, a modest number in comparison to Bloomberg's $156 million and Steyer's $37 million in ad spending in Super Tuesday states.

Sanders's fundraising prowess helped him raise $25 million in January alone, allowing him to spend competitively with Steyer and Bloomberg, both of whom supplement their campaign accounts with their own personal fortunes. 

The lack of spending for both Buttigieg and Biden in Super Tuesday states is unsurprising considering the amount of money each of the candidates had on hand going into the Iowa caucuses in the beginning of February.

Prior to the contest, Buttigieg clocked less than $7 million on hand, Biden just over $7 million and Klobuchar and Warren less than $3 million, according to the paper.

Biden in particular has had campaign fundraising issues in the past, and bundlers for the camp have anticipated further problems with donations given his lackluster finishes in both the Iowa and New Hampshire nominating contests earlier this month. 

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Buttigieg specifically has executed a high-risk, high-reward strategy. His campaign poured $14 million into Iowa and New Hampshire in January. The results were strong, with the former mayor virtually tying Sanders in Iowa and narrowly coming in second place in New Hampshire.

However, the former mayor's money dump seemed to have emptied his campaign's coffers. On Thursday Buttigieg sent an email to supporters saying that he needs to raise $13 million by Super Tuesday to remain competitive.

Warren reportedly raised more than $10 million in January, but spend $23 million. The imbalance caused her campaign to dip into $400,000 of a $3 million line of credit, but according to her campaign the move "ultimately wasn’t necessary.”

Warren received a bump thanks to a strong primary debate performance in Las Vegas Wednesday, raising nearly $3 million that day.

Additionally, Klobuchar raised $5.5 million in January and Biden raised $9 million, but like many of their fellow candidates they spent more than they brought in — $7.6 million and $11 million, respectively.