Steyer campaign reaches tentative union deal with staffers

Steyer campaign reaches tentative union deal with staffers
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Tom SteyerTom SteyerOvernight Energy: 'Eye of fire,' Exxon lobbyist's comments fuel renewed attacks on oil industry | Celebrities push Biden to oppose controversial Minnesota pipeline | More than 75 companies ask Congress to pass clean electricity standard Celebrities push Biden to oppose controversial Minnesota pipeline Six things to watch as California heads for recall election MORE’s presidential campaign announced Friday it has reached a tentative union deal with its staffers and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 2325, just a day before Nevada holds its caucuses.

“We are delighted to have reached an agreement with IBEW Local 2325 that will benefit our staff. Tom’s strongest and most steadfast partner has always been organized labor,” Heather Hargreaves, Steyer’s campaign manager, said in a statement. 

“Tom knows that unionization is a living, breathing example of democracy at work, and a critical counterweight to the corporate power that has become entrenched in government at all levels," she continued. "He will continue to fight for union workers as president, including by protecting their right to keep their hard-won benefits such as health care plans.” 

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The Steyer campaign first recognized the local IBEW chapter as the exclusive bargaining representative for its campaign staff earlier this month. 

Democratic presidential candidates have put a premium on gaining support from labor groups as the party works to win back working-class voters who traditionally vote for Democrats but flipped to President TrumpDonald TrumpKinzinger says Trump 'winning' because so many Republicans 'have remained silent' Our remote warfare counterterrorism strategy is more risk than reward Far-right rally draws small crowd, large police presence at Capitol MORE in 2016. 

Unions are expected to play an important role in the nomination race including in states like Nevada, where candidates have actively courted the labor vote.

Staff at several other presidential campaigns, including those of Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenFederal Reserve officials' stock trading sparks ethics review Manchin keeps Washington guessing on what he wants Warren, Daines introduce bill honoring 13 killed in Kabul attack MORE (D-Mass.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersSunday shows preview: Coronavirus dominates as country struggles with delta variant Democrats urge Biden to commute sentences of 4K people on home confinement Briahna Joy Gray: Push toward major social spending amid pandemic was 'short-lived' MORE (I-Vt.), former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegOn The Money — Presented by Wells Fargo — Pelosi plows full speed ahead on jam-packed agenda Blumenthal calls on Buttigieg to investigate American Airlines-JetBlue partnership LGBT film festival to premiere documentary about Pete Buttigieg MORE and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenSunday shows preview: Coronavirus dominates as country struggles with delta variant Did President Biden institute a vaccine mandate for only half the nation's teachers? Democrats lean into vaccine mandates ahead of midterms MORE, have all unionized.

Steyer has worked to cast himself as an ally of unions, saying in his economic plan that he would “support their right to organize for worker protections.”