Klobuchar campaign to focus on smaller states

Klobuchar campaign to focus on smaller states
© Greg Nash

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharTwitter CEO: 'Not true' that removing Trump campaign video was illegal, as president has claimed Biden formally clinches Democratic presidential nomination Hillicon Valley: Conspiracy theories run rampant online amid Floyd protests | First lawsuit filed against Trump social media order | Snapchat to no longer promote Trump's account MORE’s (D-Minn.) presidential campaign will work to stay viable in coming primaries with investments in smaller states, according to a memo detailing the strategy ahead of Super Tuesday.

"We will be making new investments on TV and digital in ​Colorado, California, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Texas and Utah," campaign manager Justin Buoen said in the memo. "We are also making another six-figure investment on South Carolina TV, as Amy continues to ramp up efforts in the Palmetto state."

After a surprise third-place finish in the New Hampshire primary, the Klobuchar campaign will target states with more conservative, less diverse electorates, particularly those where the other candidates are spending less time.

ADVERTISEMENT

Establishment Democrats have expressed increased worry that Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden formally clinches Democratic presidential nomination OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump signs order removing environmental reviews for major projects | New Trump air rule will limit future pollution regulations, critics say | DNC climate group calls for larger federal investment on climate than Biden plan Google: Chinese and Iranian hackers targeting Biden, Trump campaigns MORE (I-Vt.) would win the party's nomination, especially with several centrist candidates, including Klobuchar, former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden formally clinches Democratic presidential nomination The Memo: Job numbers boost Trump and challenge Biden Chris Wallace: Jobs numbers show 'the political resilience of Donald Trump' MORE and former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegScaled-back Pride Month poses challenges for fundraising, outreach Biden hopes to pick VP by Aug. 1 It's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process MORE, splitting up the anti-Sanders vote.

The field also includes billionaire Tom SteyerTom SteyerBloomberg wages war on COVID-19, but will he abandon his war on coal? Overnight Energy: 600K clean energy jobs lost during pandemic, report finds | Democrats target diseases spread by wildlife | Energy Dept. to buy 1M barrels of oil Ocasio-Cortez, Schiff team up to boost youth voter turnout MORE, who has been spending aggressively in South Carolina, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenTwitter CEO: 'Not true' that removing Trump campaign video was illegal, as president has claimed Biden formally clinches Democratic presidential nomination Warren, Pressley introduce bill to make it a crime for police officers to deny medical care to people in custody MORE (D-N.Y.), who had a strong performance in last week's debate, and former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergIt's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process Liberals embrace super PACs they once shunned .7 billion expected to be spent in 2020 campaign despite coronavirus: report MORE, who is set to formally begin competing for delegates on Super Tuesday on March 3, when more than a dozen states will hold contests.

Democrats worried about Sanders have hoped that some of the other candidates might drop out of the race, but there has been little sign that the field will narrow before March 3.

Klobuchar's campaign said it is preparing an “aggressive schedule” in states such as Arkansas, Alabama, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Virginia as well as “key congressional districts where we can acquire delegates, in places like California, Colorado, Massachusetts, Utah, Texas and Maine.”

“Amy currently has 7 delegates, which puts her just one delegate behind Elizabeth Warren. And in the coming weeks, we expect Amy to continue to significantly grow her delegate count,” Buoen added.

ADVERTISEMENT

“We continue to see that an increase in turnout is at least partly attributable to the record number of Independents and disaffected Republicans who are deciding to vote in the Democratic primary. Amy continues to remain a top choice for persuading Republican and Independent voters we need in order to beat Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTwitter CEO: 'Not true' that removing Trump campaign video was illegal, as president has claimed Biden formally clinches Democratic presidential nomination Barr says he didn't give 'tactical' command to clear Lafayette protesters MORE in the fall,” he wrote.

Though Klobuchar finished third in New Hampshire, she fell behind Sanders, Biden, Buttigieg and Warren in Nevada and polls do not show her with high support in South Carolina.

A recent poll of her own state, which votes on Super Tuesday, shows her in the lead but with Sanders just 6 points behind.