Largest Democratic super PAC targets Trump in two new ads

Largest Democratic super PAC targets Trump in two new ads
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The largest Democratic super PAC is targeting President TrumpDonald TrumpHarris stumps for McAuliffe in Virginia On The Money — Sussing out what Sinema wants Hillicon Valley — Presented by Xerox — The Facebook Oversight Board is not pleased MORE in two new ads released Tuesday.

Priorities USA Executive Director Patrick McHugh released the group’s first TV ads of 2020, scheduled to run in battleground states. The first ad seeks to show “the real negative impact that Trump’s policies, chaos, impulsiveness, and arrogance are having on people’s lives,” McHugh tweeted.

The ad begins and ends with the president’s quote “I have the right to do whatever I want as president.” In between, there are scattered news reports about the January 2019 government shutdown and Trump’s policies on health care, North Korea and ISIS.  

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The second ad focuses on a breast cancer survivor named Amy, who says the president is threatening her health care.

“Now Donald Trump wants to eliminate protections for pre-existing conditions like mine,” she says. “It would make it impossible for people like me to find affordable health care.”

“If Donald Trump had his way, I would no longer have health insurance coverage,” she added.  

Trump's administration is backing a court challenge to overturn ObamaCare and eliminate its protections for those with pre-existing conditions.

The ad ends with the text “Donald Trump isn’t working for us,” overlaid on the screen. 

The Democratic PAC is stepping up its campaign advertising as Democratic voters across the country have said their top priority is getting the president out of office.

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden says expanding Medicare to include hearing, dental and vision a 'reach' Schumer endorses democratic socialist India Walton in Buffalo mayor's race On The Money — Sussing out what Sinema wants MORE (I-Vt.) leads the pack of Democratic presidential candidates with 45 delegates, following his first-place finishes in Nevada and New Hampshire.