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Giuliani: Bloomberg 'jeopardized' stop and frisk by 'overusing it'

Giuliani: Bloomberg 'jeopardized' stop and frisk by 'overusing it'
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpPennsylvania Supreme Court strikes down GOP bid to stop election certification Biden looks to career officials to restore trust, morale in government agencies Sunday shows preview: US health officials brace for post-holiday COVID-19 surge MORE’s personal attorney Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiKrebs says allegations of foreign interference in 2020 election 'farcical'  Trump campaign loses appeal over Pennsylvania race Krebs: I'm 'most upset' I didn't get to say goodbye to my team MORE said Wednesday that Democratic presidential candidate and former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergBiden's great challenge: Build an economy for long-term prosperity and security The secret weapon in Biden's fight against climate change Sanders celebrates Biden-Harris victory: 'Thank God democracy won out' MORE “jeopardized” his stop-and-frisk policy by "overusing it."

Giuliani, another former mayor of New York City, said Bloomberg is “running away” from his policy that Democrats are now critiquing for disproportionately impacting people of color. 

Bloomberg is running away from Stop, Question and Frisk which he jeopardized by overusing it,” he tweeted.

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He also accused former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPennsylvania Supreme Court strikes down GOP bid to stop election certification Biden looks to career officials to restore trust, morale in government agencies Biden transition adds new members to coronavirus task force MORE of abandoning his support of the 1994 crime bill, which he “used to be proud of.”

“Biden is running away from the Crime Bill which saved many lives,” he tweeted. “He used to be proud of it. @realDonaldTrump tells you what he really believes.”

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Bloomberg has had to answer for his police policy, which a court found to be racially discriminatory in 2013. The practice was stopped after the mayor left office that same year.

The White House hopeful has apologized multiple times for the policy, but earlier this month audio surfaced of his comments defending the practice.

“Ninety-five percent of your murders — murderers and murder victims — fit one M.O. You can just take the description, Xerox it and pass it out to all the cops,” he said. “They are male, minorities, 16 to 25.”

The former New York mayor hasn’t begun advocating for delegates yet but has spent more money than any other presidential candidate on advertising, emphasizing the Super Tuesday states.