Public Enemy, Sarah Silverman to join Sanders at rally in Los Angeles

Public Enemy, Sarah Silverman to join Sanders at rally in Los Angeles
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Legendary rap group Public Enemy will join comedian Sarah Silverman and actor Dick Van Dyke at a Los Angeles rally for Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersHillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike Overnight Energy: Court upholds Trump repeal of Obama fracking rule | Oil price drop threatens fracking boom | EPA eases rules on gasoline sales amid coronavirus The Hill's Campaign Report: Sanders pushes on in 2020 race MORE (I-Vt.) on Sunday ahead of Super Tuesday.

The rap group, known for its politically charged lyrics, will perform two days before voters in California and 12 other states cast their primary ballots. The Sanders campaign announced the event with a poster invoking Public Enemy’s 1989 single “Fight the Power,” which was used as the theme for the Spike Lee film “Do the Right Thing” the same year.

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Public Enemy is the latest musical act to perform at a rally for Vermont senator and Democratic front-runner.

Shortly before Sanders’s victory in the New Hampshire primaries, the Strokes performed at a get-out-the-vote concert in the Granite State that drew an estimated 7,500 attendees.

Silverman also endorsed Sanders in the 2016 primaries before vocally backing Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillary Clinton on US leading in coronavirus cases: Trump 'did promise "America First"' Democratic fears rise again as coronavirus pushes Biden to sidelines Clintons send pizza to NY hospital staff treating coronavirus MORE after she secured the nomination, telling discontented supporters of Sanders that they were "being ridiculous" at the 2016 Democratic National Convention.

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Van Dyke endorsed Sanders earlier this month, appearing in an ad for the candidate and urging older voters to back him.

“Why wouldn’t an older citizen vote for somebody with that kind of a record and with that kind of experience and honesty and trust?" Van Dyke, 94, asked in the clip. “It just doesn’t make sense to me that he’s not getting my generation. And I want to urge my generation to get out and vote for him, please."

The TV legend has not hit the campaign trail with a candidate since Sen. Eugene McCarthy (D-Minn.) in 1968.