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Biden said he would contest nomination even if Sanders leads in delegates: 'You don't change the rules in middle of the game'

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenNoem touts South Dakota coronavirus response, knocks lockdowns in CPAC speech On The Trail: Cuomo and Newsom — a story of two embattled governors Biden celebrates vaccine approval but warns 'current improvement could reverse' MORE said Sunday he would contest the presidential primary nomination at the Democratic  convention if Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersHouse Democrats pass sweeping .9T COVID-19 relief bill with minimum wage hike House set for tight vote on COVID-19 relief package On The Money: Democrats scramble to save minimum wage hike | Personal incomes rise, inflation stays low after stimulus burst MORE (I-Vt.) is leading in delegates without securing a majority. 

“The rules have been set,” Biden said on CNN’s “State of the Union.” 

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Biden questioned Sanders’ take that the candidate with a plurality of pledged delegates the convention should become the nominee. 

“I wonder where that view was when he was challenging Hillary when she went in with a commanding lead,” Biden added. “You don't change the rules in the middle of the game.” 

Sanders is the only candidate in the field this year to insist that the candidate with the most pledged delegates should be the party nominee. He held the opposing view in 2016 when facing former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMedia circles wagons for conspiracy theorist Neera Tanden The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Senate ref axes minimum wage, House votes today on relief bill Democratic strategists start women-run media consulting firm MORE

Biden’s commitment to challenge the nomination comes after he won his first primary in South Carolina on Saturday. 

Biden is trailing Sanders in the number of pledged delegates as the candidates head into Super Tuesday, when the largest number of states will hold primaries and caucuses including Texas and California.