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Warren drops out of presidential race

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenSchumer vows to advance two-pronged infrastructure plan next month Overnight Health Care: CDC panel meets on vaccines and heart inflammation | Health officials emphasize vaccine is safe | Judge rules Missouri doesn't have to implement Medicaid expansion Democrats urge Biden to extend moratorium on student loan payments MORE (D-Mass.) ended her presidential bid Thursday after failing to gain traction in the 2020 Democratic primary race. 

Warren made the announcement to her staff on Thursday morning, saying her campaign achieved progress bringing attention to a number of different platforms. 

"We didn’t reach our goal, but what we have done together — what you have done — has made a lasting difference. It’s not the scale of the difference we wanted to make, but it matters — and the changes will have ripples for years to come," Warren told her staff.

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"What we have done — and the ideas we have launched into the world, the way we have fought this fight, the relationships we have built — will carry through, carry through for the rest of this election, and the one after that, and the one after that," she continued. 

Warren is set to give a press conference at 12:30 pm. 

It is not clear whether Warren will endorse one of the other Democrats still running in the presidential race.

The news comes after Warren failed to perform well in the early primary contests or on Super Tuesday, when she came in third in her home state of Massachusetts. 

Warren championed a number of progressive proposals on the campaign trail, often telling voters and reporters that she "had a plan for that" when asked about specific issues. 

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The senator's campaign was largely based on taking on what she branded as a corrupt financial system in the U.S.

However, Warren ran in the same ideological lane as fellow Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSenators say White House aides agreed to infrastructure 'framework' Briahna Joy Gray: Biden is keeping the filibuster to have 'a Joe Manchin presidency' On The Money: Biden to fire FHFA director after Supreme Court removes restriction | Yellen pleads with Congress to raise debt ceiling MORE (I-Vt.), effectively dividing the Democratic Party's progressive base. Both senators avoided attacking each other early on in the primary, instead pushing for their liberal proposals including "Medicare for All." 

That dynamic changed when Warren confirmed a CNN report saying Sanders told the Massachusetts senator that he did not believe a woman could win the presidency during a private meeting in 2018. Sanders denied the allegation. 

One of Warren's last stands on the campaign trail was on the debate stage when she repeatedly hit former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg for his status as a billionaire and about his past alleged comments about former female employees. 

Warren's exit from the race leaves Sanders and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenSchumer vows to advance two-pronged infrastructure plan next month Biden appoints veteran housing, banking regulator as acting FHFA chief Iran claims U.S. to lift all oil sanctions but State Department says 'nothing is agreed' MORE as the last two viable candidates standing. Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardTulsi Gabbard on Chicago mayor's decision to limit media interviews to people of color: 'Anti-white racism' Fox News says network and anchor Leland Vittert have 'parted ways' New co-chairs named for congressional caucus for millennials MORE (D-Hawaii) is still in the race but has trailed well behind the race's front-runners.

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It is unclear who Warren will endorse going forward in the primary. Her ideological stance aligns more closely with Sanders, but tensions have simmered between the two campaigns and their supporters.

Sanders condemned comments about Warren from a number of his supporters on Wednesday, telling MSNBC's Rachel MaddowRachel Anne MaddowDemocratic group launches seven-figure ad campaign on voting rights bill GOP's attacks on Fauci at center of pandemic message Fauci hits back at GOP criticism over emails: 'It's all nonsense' MORE that he was “actually disgusted” and “aghast” by online vitriol directed at Warren. 

The Vermont senator confirmed earlier on Wednesday that he had spoken by phone with Warren earlier that morning. 

Updated at 12:22 p.m.