Obama spoke with Buttigieg after he dropped out of 2020 race: report

Former President Obama spoke with former presidential candidate Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBiden campaign hires top cybersecurity officials to defend against threats Biden strikes populist tone in blistering rebuke of Trump, Wall Street Buttigieg's new book, 'Trust,' slated for October release MORE after he dropped out of the 2020 race Sunday, The New York Times reported Monday

Obama reportedly did not directly tell Buttigieg to endorse former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump commutes Roger Stone's sentence Hillicon Valley: Facebook considers political ad ban | Senators raise concerns over civil rights audit | Amazon reverses on telling workers to delete TikTok House Democrat warns about 'inaccurate' polls: Trump voters 'fundamentally undercounted' MORE. But he did tell the former South Bend, Ind., mayor that he now has leverage and should consider how to use it, a Democratic official familiar with the conversation told the Times. 

A source confirmed to The Hill on Monday that Buttigieg plans to endorse Biden, who is also set to get the backing of Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Fauci says focus should be on pausing reopenings rather than reverting to shutdowns; WHO director pleads for international unity in pandemic response State election officials warn budget cuts could lead to November chaos Biden strikes populist tone in blistering rebuke of Trump, Wall Street MORE (D-Minn.), who will announce the end of her own 2020 White House bid on Monday.

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Buttigieg positioned himself as a moderate candidate and an alternative to self-described democratic socialist Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTrump glosses over virus surge during Florida trip The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Fauci says focus should be on pausing reopenings rather than reverting to shutdowns; WHO director pleads for international unity in pandemic response Ex-Sanders aide says Biden unity task forces need to go farther MORE (I-Vt.), whom he indirectly criticized in his announcement speech

“We need leadership to heal a divided nation, not drive us further apart,” he said. “We need a broad based agenda to truly deliver for the American people, not one that gets lost in ideology. We need an approach strong enough not only to win the White House, but hold the House, win the Senate and send [Senate Majority Leader] Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHillicon Valley: Facebook considers political ad ban | Senators raise concerns over civil rights audit | Amazon reverses on telling workers to delete TikTok Ernst: Renaming Confederate bases is the 'right thing to do' despite 'heck' from GOP Advocacy groups pressure Senate to reconvene and boost election funding MORE into retirement.”

The former mayor earned 26 delegates from Iowa, New Hampshire and Nevada, beating Sanders in the Hawkeye State. Sanders currently holds the most delegates at 60, while Biden’s Saturday win in South Carolina boosted him to second place in the primary field with 54 delegates. 

Amie Parnes contributed.