DNC chairman 'not contemplating' move to online convention

Democratic National Committee (DNC) Chairman Tom PerezThomas Edward PerezClinton’s top five vice presidential picks Government social programs: Triumph of hope over evidence Labor’s 'wasteful spending and mismanagement” at Workers’ Comp MORE said in a new interview that he is “not contemplating” moving the party's convention online due to the growing coronavirus concerns.

Perez told Axios on HBO that the July convention in Milwaukee is set to continue as planned.

"We are working with our state and local partners, and I'm confident that we can work a plan that will enable us to have our convention," he said in the interview, which was taped Monday and is set to air in full on Sunday.

ADVERTISEMENT

Perez added that the DNC remains in communication with health officials and monitors the situation “every single day.”

He also noted that “we’d have to change the rules” to move the convention online.

"We'd have to change the rules," Perez said. "We're not contemplating rule changes.” 

“I'm very confident that we’re going to be able to carry it off, and I’m equally confident in the competence of our team,” he added. 

The current rules in the DNC’s charter and bylaws say “voting by proxy shall not be permitted at the National Convention,” Axios noted.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpWhite House sued over lack of sign language interpreters at coronavirus briefings Wife blames Trump, lack of masks for husband's coronavirus death in obit: 'May Karma find you all' Trump authorizes reduced funding for National Guard coronavirus response through 2020 MORE late Wednesday announced travel restrictions from Europe to fight the coronavirus, while elderly people are being advised to stay at home and avoid crowds and the presidential candidates are canceling rallies.

ADVERTISEMENT

Several large events across the country, including all NBA games, the South by Southwest festival and others have been suspended or canceled to prevent large crowds from gathering and spreading the virus.

The U.S. has recorded more than 1,300 cases and at least 38 deaths from the virus, while eight people have recovered thus far. Worldwide, more than 68,000 people have recovered, with more than 126,000 cases reported, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Updated at 4:51 p.m.