Biden says he'll adopt plans from Sanders, Warren

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenCuomo grilled by brother about running for president: 'No. no' Top Democratic super PACs team up to boost Biden The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump, Biden spar over coronavirus response MORE said Sunday that he was adopting plans from Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTop Democratic super PACs team up to boost Biden Poll: Biden leads Sanders by 22 points GE employees urge company to use laid-off workers to make ventilators MORE’s (I-Vt.) and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenDemocratic senators ask Pompeo to provide coronavirus aid to Palestinian territories Seth Meyers returning to late-night TV with 'hybrid episodes' Biden tops Trump by 9 points in Fox News poll MORE’s (D-Mass.) campaigns.

The moderate Democrat announced he would include two the progressive candidates’ plans involving education costs and bankruptcy. 

“Across the country, middle and working class families are being squeezed by debt,” he said. “This is a massive problem, and one that we need all of the best ideas to solve. That's why today, I'm adopting two plans from @BernieSanders and @ewarren to achieve this.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Biden announced over Twitter that he is adding Sanders’s idea to make public colleges and universities free for families whose income is below $125,000.

“It's a good idea, and after consideration, I am proud to add it to my platform,” he posted.

ADVERTISEMENT

The moderate presidential candidate also endorsed Warren’s plan, saying “few people in the country understand how bankruptcy hurts working families more than Elizabeth Warren.” She called her proposal “Fixing Our Bankruptcy System to Give People a Second Chance.”

“This primary has brought out our party's best ideas, and our nation is better for it,” he tweeted. “If I'm President, I'll continue to bring the best ideas from all corners of the country and fight to make them reality.”

The Democratic primary evolved into a debate among progressive and moderate candidates. The two main candidates representing each of those sides, Biden and Sanders, will debate Sunday. 

Early on in the primary, Sanders held a strong lead, winning the electoral vote in New Hampshire and Nevada and the popular vote in Iowa. 

But Biden began his comeback with a win in South Carolina, prompting his fellow moderate candidates, former South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegReuters poll finds Sanders cutting Biden national lead to single digits Biden says he'll adopt plans from Sanders, Warren Buttigieg guest-hosts for Jimmy Kimmel: 'I've got nothing else going on' MORE and Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: FCC chief proposes 0M telehealth program | Twitter takes down posts promoting anti-malaria drugs for coronavirus| Whole Foods workers plan Tuesday strike Trump says election proposals in coronavirus stimulus bill would hurt Republican chances Biden tops Trump by 9 points in Fox News poll MORE (D-Minn.) to drop out and endorse him to consolidate the moderate vote to prevent a Sanders nomination.

Since then, the former vice president has conquered the Super Tuesday and March 10 primaries. Biden currently has 890 delegates out of the 1,991 needed to clinch the nomination, while Sanders has 736. Some delegates still need to be distributed from the past two primary days.