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Biden says he'll adopt plans from Sanders, Warren

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden team wants to understand Trump effort to 'hollow out government agencies' Overnight Defense: Trump transgender ban 'inflicts concrete harms,' study says | China objects to US admiral's Taiwan visit Protect our world: How the Biden administration can save lives and economies worldwide MORE said Sunday that he was adopting plans from Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersFive House Democrats who could join Biden Cabinet Biden names John Kerry as 'climate czar' in new administration In the final chapter of 2020, we must recommit to repairing our democracy MORE’s (I-Vt.) and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOn The Money: Biden to nominate Yellen for Treasury secretary | 'COVID cliff' looms | Democrats face pressure to back smaller stimulus Biden to nominate Janet Yellen as Treasury secretary: report Bottom line MORE’s (D-Mass.) campaigns.

The moderate Democrat announced he would include two the progressive candidates’ plans involving education costs and bankruptcy. 

“Across the country, middle and working class families are being squeezed by debt,” he said. “This is a massive problem, and one that we need all of the best ideas to solve. That's why today, I'm adopting two plans from @BernieSanders and @ewarren to achieve this.”

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Biden announced over Twitter that he is adding Sanders’s idea to make public colleges and universities free for families whose income is below $125,000.

“It's a good idea, and after consideration, I am proud to add it to my platform,” he posted.

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The moderate presidential candidate also endorsed Warren’s plan, saying “few people in the country understand how bankruptcy hurts working families more than Elizabeth Warren.” She called her proposal “Fixing Our Bankruptcy System to Give People a Second Chance.”

“This primary has brought out our party's best ideas, and our nation is better for it,” he tweeted. “If I'm President, I'll continue to bring the best ideas from all corners of the country and fight to make them reality.”

The Democratic primary evolved into a debate among progressive and moderate candidates. The two main candidates representing each of those sides, Biden and Sanders, will debate Sunday. 

Early on in the primary, Sanders held a strong lead, winning the electoral vote in New Hampshire and Nevada and the popular vote in Iowa. 

But Biden began his comeback with a win in South Carolina, prompting his fellow moderate candidates, former South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete Buttigieg'Biff is president': Michael J. Fox says Trump has played on 'every worst instinct in mankind' Buttigieg: Denying Biden intelligence briefings is about protecting Trump's 'ego' Biden's win is not a policy mandate — he should govern accordingly MORE and Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharFormer Minnesota Democratic leader quits party Top cybersecurity official ousted by Trump Lawmakers question tech CEOs about content moderation in first post-election hearing MORE (D-Minn.) to drop out and endorse him to consolidate the moderate vote to prevent a Sanders nomination.

Since then, the former vice president has conquered the Super Tuesday and March 10 primaries. Biden currently has 890 delegates out of the 1,991 needed to clinch the nomination, while Sanders has 736. Some delegates still need to be distributed from the past two primary days.