Sanders staffers will remain on campaign's health care plan through fall

Sanders staffers will remain on campaign's health care plan through fall

Staffers for Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersGloves come off as Democrats fight for House seat in California Senate Democrats pump brakes on new stimulus checks The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Unemployment claims now at 41 million with 2.1 million more added to rolls; Topeka mayor says cities don't have enough tests for minorities and homeless communities MORE’s (I-Vt.) 2020 presidential bid will be able to remain on the campaign's health care plan through the fall despite Sanders’s suspension of his campaign Wednesday, a spokesperson announced Thursday.

Faiz Shakir, Sanders’s campaign manager, made the announcement during an all-staff call, and a Sanders campaign official confirmed to The Hill that workers would remain on the campaign health care plan through October.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Thankful to Bernie who we just found out was adamant his entire campaign staff stays on our health insurance through November so yay I still have health care but health insurance shouldn't be tied to your job!!!!!!!!” Sara Pearl, a former supervising producer for the campaign, tweeted Thursday.

The announcement comes one day after Sanders announced he would suspend his campaign, leaving former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden campaign cancels fundraiser with Mueller prosecutor Twitter joins Democrats to boost mail-in voting — here's why The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation MORE unopposed for the Democratic presidential nomination.

It also comes weeks after a former campaign staffer for former New York Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergIt's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process Liberals embrace super PACs they once shunned .7 billion expected to be spent in 2020 campaign despite coronavirus: report MORE’s campaign sued on behalf of herself and other former campaign workers, arguing they were promised jobs through November before the campaign laid them off and Bloomberg ended his own campaign.