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Poll: 1 in 5 voters prefer Sanders for Biden VP pick

Poll: 1 in 5 voters prefer Sanders for Biden VP pick

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersStudy: Early unemployment cutoff would cost 16M people 0B Machine Gun Kelly reveals how Bernie Sanders aided him in his relationship with Megan Fox Overnight Health Care: CDC approves Pfizer vaccine for adolescents aged 12-15 | House moderates signal concerns with Pelosi drug pricing bill | Panel blasts COVID-19 response MORE (I-Vt.) tops the list of former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenFauci says school should be open 'full blast' five days a week in the fall Overnight Defense: Military sexual assault reform bill has votes to pass in Senate l First active duty service member arrested over Jan. 6 riot l Israeli troops attack Gaza Strip Immigration experts say GOP senators questioned DHS secretary with misleading chart MORE’s potential running mates, according to a Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll survey released exclusively to The Hill.

The poll shows that 1 in 5 registered voters — 20 percent — prefer Sanders for Biden’s vice presidential slot, the highest support of any would-be running mate presented to respondents in the survey. 

But Sanders is unlikely to be considered, if not entirely ruled out, as Biden’s running mate in the general election. Biden vowed last month to choose a woman as his vice presidential pick and has said he’s considering a list of between six and 10 candidates for the job.

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That list remains secret, though there are a handful of potential candidates that have drawn speculation, including Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisImmigration experts say GOP senators questioned DHS secretary with misleading chart Carper urges Biden to nominate ambassadors amid influx at border Priest who presided over Biden's inaugural mass resigns from university post after investigation MORE (D-Calif.) and Amy KlobucharAmy Klobuchar Klobuchar offers tribute to her father, who died Wednesday The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Cheney poised to be ousted; Biden to host big meeting Senate panel deadlocks in vote on sweeping elections bill MORE (D-Minn.), both former presidential candidates, as well as Michigan Gov. Gretchen WhitmerGretchen WhitmerCompany continues operating pipeline through Michigan despite governor's order Michigan Republican offers bill to fine fact-checkers for errors Michigan to end remote work after reaching 55 percent vaccination rate MORE (D) and Rep. Val DemingsValdez (Val) Venita DemingsDemocrat Nikki Fried teases possible challenge to DeSantis The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - Upbeat jobs data, relaxed COVID-19 restrictions offer rosier US picture Democrats cool on Crist's latest bid for Florida governor MORE (D-Fla.). 

The Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll survey, however, showed that the top-rated woman for the VP slot is Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren says Republican Party 'eating itself and it is discovering that the meal is poisonous' Briahna Joy Gray: Warren not endorsing Sanders in 2020 was 'really frustrating' McConnell hits Democratic critics of Israel MORE (D-Mass.), one of Biden’s former rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination. Thirteen percent of registered voters surveyed said that Biden should choose the Massachusetts senator as his running mate.

Warren has expressed at least some interest in the job.

Asked by MSNBC’s Rachel MaddowRachel Anne MaddowSchumer works to balance a divided caucus's demands Matt Taibbi: Rachel Maddow has become the new Bill O'Reilly Ocasio-Cortez eyeing T over 10 years for infrastructure MORE last week what her response would be if Biden were to offer her a spot on the ticket, Warren responded bluntly: “Yes.”

Harris and Klobuchar, meanwhile, both notched 10 percent in the survey, while Whitmer came in with 3 percent. 

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Meanwhile, 7 percent of registered voters surveyed said they would prefer former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBiden says he and GOP both 'sincere about' seeking infrastructure compromise The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Colonial pays hackers as service is restored The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden expresses optimism on bipartisanship; Cheney ousted MORE; 8 percent preferred former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergYang: 'Defund the police is the wrong approach for New York City' New York mayoral candidates go viral for vastly underestimating housing costs Melinda Gates tapped divorce lawyers in 2019 after Epstein links to husband: report MORE (D); 3 percent preferred billionaire activist Tom SteyerTom SteyerTop 12 political donors accounted for almost 1 of every 13 dollars raised since 2009: study California Democrats weigh their recall options Why we should be leery of companies entering political fray MORE; and 11 percent said they would prefer New York Gov. Andrew CuomoAndrew CuomoCuomo accuser blasts governor's 'Trumpian gaslighting' over harassment allegations Cuomo defends himself, pushes back amid harassment probe Bipartisan Senate bill introduced to give gyms B in relief MORE. Buttigieg, Bloomberg and Steyer are former 2020 candidates for the Democratic nomination.

Mark PennMark PennPoll: Americans back new spending, tax hikes on wealthy, but remain wary of economic impact Biden's poor TV ratings against Trump is exactly what this administration wants 64 percent view 'cancel culture' as threat to freedom: poll MORE, the co-director of the Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll, said that Sanders’s top spot on the list likely owes to his appeal to the progressive wing of the Democratic Party. But he said that geographic considerations — Klobuchar’s status as a Midwestern senator, for instance — may be on voters’ minds, as well.

“I think looking at the list, a lot of the party would favor Bernie Sanders, who would energize the left wing of the party,” Penn said. “But I suspect, based on this polling, that Amy Klobuchar is at the top of the list given her Midwestern credentials, though Kamala Harris would also be in the running.”

Biden has signaled that his running mate search is set to begin in earnest in mid-April, telling donors in at a virtual fundraising event that he would soon announce the formation of a committee to vet potential vice presidential candidates.

“It’s kind of presumptuous, but sometime in the middle of the month we’re going to announce a committee that’s going to be overseeing the vice presidential selection process,” he said, according to a press pool report at the time.

Other possible picks that have received speculation include Sen. Catherine Cortez MastoCatherine Marie Cortez MastoOn The Money: Incomes, consumer spending soared in March | Harris, senators work behind scenes on jobs package | Biden cancels some border wall construction Hillicon Valley: DOJ to review cyber challenges | Gaetz, House Republicans want to end funding for postal service surveillance | TikTok gets new CEO Americans for Prosperity launches campaign targeting six Democrats to oppose ending filibuster MORE (D-Nev.) and Stacey Abrams, the 2018 Democratic nominee for Georgia governor, who has openly expressed interest in the running mate slot.

Biden and his associates have also spoken with former President Obama and former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderOne quick asylum fix: How Garland can help domestic violence survivors First redistricting lawsuits filed by Democratic group On The Trail: Census data kicks off the biggest redistricting fight in American history MORE about the process of selecting a running mate. Holder co-chaired the process for Obama in 2008 along with Caroline Kennedy. 

Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll surveyed 2,394 registered voters from April 14 to 16. The poll is a collaboration of the Center for American Political Studies at Harvard University and The Harris Poll. The Hill will be working with Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll throughout 2020.

Full poll results will be posted online later this week. The Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll survey is an online sample drawn from the Harris Panel and weighted to reflect known demographics. As a representative online sample, it does not report a probability confidence interval.