Stacey Abrams makes case for VP: 'I would put my capacity to win an election' against anyone else's

Stacey Abrams makes case for VP: 'I would put my capacity to win an election' against anyone else's
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Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams said she would be the best running mate for Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Americans debate life under COVID-19 risks Biden set to make risky economic argument against Trump Hillicon Valley: Tech companies lead way on WFH forever | States and counties plead for cybersecurity assistance | Trump weighing anti-conservative bias panel MORE, making her case as contributing the most to the former vice president’s electability.

“We have to win the election. And I would point out that I ran the most successful campaign to engage the communities we need to build the broadest coalition necessary in 2020, because what we are going to see on the ground is that this is going to be a campaign unlike anything that’s been run before,” Abrams told The Atlantic in an interview published Friday.

Abrams electrified the Democratic base with her gubernatorial run in Georgia in 2018 in which she narrowly lost to Republican Brian Kemp. Abrams, who has openly been campaigning to be Biden’s No. 2, pointed to the energy she was able to galvanize as evidence that she would expand Biden’s appeal.

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“If you look at what we were able to accomplish in Georgia, the growth of the numbers and the composition of the voters, I would put my capacity to win an election as the VP running mate alongside anyone’s,” she said.

Abrams’s name has frequently been touted as a possible vice presidential nominee for Biden, who pledged last month to pick a woman as his running mate. The Georgia Democrat has been openly campaigning for the job, speaking about the job during a number of media appearances and saying she would be an “excellent” addition to Biden’s ticket. 

Other contenders who have been floated include former presidential candidates Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisTrump retweets personal attacks on Clinton, Pelosi, Abrams It's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Coal company sues EPA over power plant pollution regulation | Automakers fight effort to freeze fuel efficiency standards | EPA watchdog may probe agency's response to California water issues MORE (D-Calif.), Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharPoll: Biden leads Trump by 5 points in Minnesota The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - US death toll nears 100,000 as country grapples with reopening It's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process MORE (D-Minn.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenPentagon charts its own course on COVID-19, risking Trump's ire Warren to host high-dollar fundraiser for Biden It's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process MORE (D-Mass.), as well as Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D). 

Biden has been under pressure from some of his supporters to pick a black woman to recognize the key role African American voters have played in buoying his White House bid.

“I really believe that we've reached a point in this country where African American women need to be rewarded for the loyalty that they've given to this party,” House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) said last month.