Loeffler books $4M in ads for Georgia Senate race

Loeffler books $4M in ads for Georgia Senate race
© Greg Nash

Sen. Kelly LoefflerKelly LoefflerThe 10 Senate seats most likely to flip The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden seeks to tamp down controversy over remarks about black support Loeffler says she won't drop out of Georgia Senate race after stock trade controversy MORE (R-Ga.) is poised to spend roughly $4 million on a series of ads pushing back on criticism of her financial transactions and touting her efforts to respond to the coronavirus pandemic.

The ad buy is the most expensive yet from Loeffler, a multimillionaire former financial services executive who has already vowed to spend $20 million of her own money on the Senate race.

The three new ads are set to launch Tuesday on broadcast, cable, radio and digital platforms across Georgia, Loeffler’s campaign said Monday.

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The ads characterize recent attacks on Loeffler as “liberal lies,” while touting her response to the coronavirus pandemic, including donating her Senate salary to charities involved in relief efforts.

“While the Left, media and her opponents play politics, Kelly will not be distracted by their false attacks,” Stephen Lawson, Loeffler’s communications director, said in a statement Monday. “Instead, she remains laser-focused on helping Georgians emerge from this crisis stronger than ever.”

One ad draws a direct comparison between Loeffler and President TrumpDonald John TrumpMulvaney: 'We've overreacted a little bit' to coronavirus Former CBS News president: Most major cable news outlets 'unrelentingly liberal' in 'fear and loathing' of Trump An old man like me should be made more vulnerable to death by COVID-19 MORE, saying both have been “unfairly targeted” by attacks.

“The liberals unfairly target President Trump every day, just like they’re unfairly targeting conservative Kelly Loeffler,” a narrator says in the ad, as video clips of Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersHillicon Valley: Tech companies lead way on WFH forever | States and counties plead for cybersecurity assistance | Trump weighing anti-conservative bias panel Biden wins Hawaii primary Warren to host high-dollar fundraiser for Biden MORE (I-Vt.), former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Americans debate life under COVID-19 risks Biden set to make risky economic argument against Trump Hillicon Valley: Tech companies lead way on WFH forever | States and counties plead for cybersecurity assistance | Trump weighing anti-conservative bias panel MORE and Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiBottom line This week: Surveillance fight sets early test for House's proxy voting Women suffering steeper job losses in COVID-19 economy MORE (D-Calif.) flash across the screen. “But they’re both standing strong.”

Loeffler was appointed to the Senate late last year to fill the seat of now-retired Sen. Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonThe 10 Senate seats most likely to flip Loeffler says she won't drop out of Georgia Senate race after stock trade controversy Kelly Loeffler's husband donates million to pro-Trump group MORE (R). She will face voters for the first time in November, and she has already drawn an intraparty challenge from Rep. Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsThe 10 Senate seats most likely to flip Loeffler says she won't drop out of Georgia Senate race after stock trade controversy Kelly Loeffler's husband donates million to pro-Trump group MORE, who has touted himself as a Trump loyalist and more reliable conservative.

A handful of Democrats are also competing for the chance to flip the Senate seat. The Rev. Raphael Warnock is the preferred candidate of national Democrats.

Loeffler’s stock trades have come under scrutiny in recent weeks, with her political opponents accusing her of profiting off the economic turmoil spurred by the coronavirus pandemic. She has denied any wrongdoing, noting that her investments are made by third-party advisers without her knowledge.