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Poll finds Warren most popular Biden VP choice among college students

Poll finds Warren most popular Biden VP choice among college students
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Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenBiden: 'Difficult decision' to staff administration with House, Senate members The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump OKs transition; Biden taps Treasury, State experience On The Money: Biden to nominate Yellen for Treasury secretary | 'COVID cliff' looms | Democrats face pressure to back smaller stimulus MORE (D-Mass.) is the most popular choice to be presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenMinnesota certifies Biden victory Trump tells allies he plans to pardon Michael Flynn: report Biden says staff has spoken with Fauci: 'He's been very, very helpful' MORE's running mate among college students, according to a new poll. 

Warren was the pick of 28 percent in the Axios-College Reaction poll released Tuesday, compared to 19 percent for Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisBiden teams to meet with Trump administration agencies Biden: 'Difficult decision' to staff administration with House, Senate members Ossoff, Warnock to knock on doors in runoff campaigns MORE (D-Calif.), who is African American and Indian American. Harris is seen as many as the favorite to be named Biden's vice presidential candidate.

Among college students who identified as Democrats, 33 percent picked Warren compared to 25 percent for Harris.

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The poll comes as Biden faces calls to pick a woman of color as his vice presidential pick.

Among Democratic students, Harris was followed by former Democratic Georgia gubernatorial candidate and voting rights activist Stacey Abrams at 14 percent and Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) at 11 percent.

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: YouTube suspends OANN amid lawmaker pressure | Dems probe Facebook, Twitter over Georgia runoff | FCC reaffirms ZTE's national security risk Democrats urge YouTube to remove election misinformation, step up efforts ahead of Georgia runoff YouTube temporarily suspends OANN account after spreading coronavirus misinformation MORE (D-Minn.), who has taken herself out of the running for vice president, was next at 6 percent. 

She was followed by Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms (D) at 4 percent, former national security adviser Susan Rice at 3 percent, Sen. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthOvernight Defense: Trump orders troop drawdown in Afghanistan and Iraq | Key Republicans call Trump plan a 'mistake' Top Democrat calls Trump's Afghan drawdown 'the right policy decision' as others warn of 'mistake' Overnight Defense: Another Defense official resigns | Pentagon chief says military 'remains strong' despite purge | Top contender for Biden DOD secretary would be historic pick MORE (D-Ill.) at 2 percent, New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan GrishamMichelle Lynn Lujan GrishamHillicon Valley: YouTube suspends OANN amid lawmaker pressure | Dems probe Facebook, Twitter over Georgia runoff | FCC reaffirms ZTE's national security risk Netflix pledges billion for production spending, expands New Mexico studio Five House Democrats who could join Biden Cabinet MORE (D) at 1 percent and Rep. Val DemingsValdez (Val) Venita DemingsDemings on Florida: 'We're excited about what we're seeing' but 'taking absolutely nothing for granted' Why it's time for a majority female Cabinet Sunday shows preview: The final push to Election Day MORE (D-Fla.) at 1 percent.

Overall, Abrams was third with 13 percent, followed by Whitmer with 11 percent and Klobuchar with 8 percent.

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Biden has pledged to choose a woman running mate, but he has not committed to pick a woman of color for the ticket. 

The same poll also found that 60 percent of Democratic and Republican college students alike said they would “definitely” vote in November even if their only choice is to vote in person and risk getting the coronavirus. 

Asked if they will vote if they can only vote by mail, 84 percent of Democratic students said they “definitely will” while just 67 percent of Republican students said the same. 

President TrumpDonald John TrumpMinnesota certifies Biden victory Trump tells allies he plans to pardon Michael Flynn: report Republican John James concedes in Michigan Senate race MORE has railed against vote-by-mail efforts in recent months, making unsubstantiated claims that it leads to mass voter fraud. 

The Axios-College Reaction poll is based on a survey of 854 total panelists. The poll was conducted June 16-17. There is a margin of error of 3.4 percentage points. 

The surveys were administered digitally and used college email addresses as an authentication tool to ensure enrollment in a four-year institution. Respondents in the poll were randomly selected from a respondent database.