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Van Drew wins GOP primary in New Jersey

Van Drew wins GOP primary in New Jersey
© Greg Nash

Rep. Jeff Van DrewJeff Van DrewDemocrats were united on top issues this Congress — but will it hold? The Hill's Campaign Newsletter: Election Day – Part 4 Van Drew fends off challenge from Kennedy after party switch MORE (R-N.J.) won the Republican primary in New Jersey’s 2nd District on Tuesday, heading to a high-profile contest in November after leaving the Democratic Party last year. 

Van Drew, previously a dentist, won with 81 percent the vote, with 36 percent of precincts reporting, according to the Associated Press. He prevailed over former Trump administration official Robert Patterson, who received 19 percent.

The first-term lawmaker has emerged as a top target for became a Republican and opposed President TrumpDonald John TrumpAppeals court OKs White House diverting military funding to border wall construction Pentagon: Tentative meeting between spy agencies, Biden transition set for early next week Conservative policy director calls Section 230 repeal an 'existential threat' for tech MORE's impeachment.

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Van Drew is set to face former teacher Amy Kennedy, who prevailed over political professor Brigid Callahan Harrison in the Democratic primary.

Van Drew defeated Republican Seth Grossman by nearly 8 points in 2018 for an open seat vacated by the retirement of Rep. Frank LoBiondoFrank Alo LoBiondoVan Drew-Kennedy race in NJ goes down to the wire Van Drew wins GOP primary in New Jersey Amy Kennedy wins NJ primary to face GOP's Van Drew MORE (R-N.J.), who had held the 2nd District seat for more than two decades.

The district, which President Trump won in 2016 by under 5 points, is rated as "Lean Republican" by nonpartisan prognosticator The Cook Political Report.

The New Jersey primaries were originally scheduled for June 2, but were postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic. The state sent over three and a half million prepaid ballots to registered voters to reduce the number of in-person voters.