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Over 570 women registered to run for office, topping 2018 record

Over 570 women registered to run for office, topping 2018 record
© Greg Nash

The 2020 election cycle has broken 2018’s record for female candidates and includes a surge of Republican women seeking to close a partisan gender gap.

A total of 574 women have filed to run in primaries for House seats and another 58 have filed for Senate primaries, according to data from the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University.

The numbers mark an increase of 20 percent from the 476 House candidates and 53 Senate candidates in 2018.

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Female Republican candidates have nearly doubled their number from 2018, with 246 women filing to run as GOP candidates this year compared to 142 in 2018.

Of the candidates, 104 are incumbents running for reelection, including candidates who attracted national attention in 2018 such as Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezThe Memo: What now for anti-Trump Republicans? Ocasio-Cortez on Taylor Greene: 'These are the kinds of people that I threw out of bars all the time' Biden faces pressure from all sides on Israel MORE (D-N.Y.), Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerFive takeaways on the House's return to budget earmarks Lawmakers say companies need to play key role in sustainability On The Money: Weekly jobless claims fall to lowest level since lockdowns | Retail sales surge in March | Dow, S&P hit new records MORE (D-Va.), Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarProject Veritas surveilled government officials to expose anti-Trump sentiments: report Biden faces pressure from all sides on Israel Omar says Cheney 'as right-wing as they come' but removal 'shameful' MORE (D-Minn.), Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyDems offer bill to help single-parent families get expanded child tax credit Warren says she'll run for reelection to Senate Bush testifies before Congress about racist treatment Black birthing people face during childbirth, pregnancy MORE (D-Mass.) and Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibOcasio-Cortez hits Yang over scrapped Eid event: 'Utterly shameful' The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden, Congress drawn into pipeline cyberattack, violence in Israel The Memo: Outrage rises among liberals over Israel MORE (D-Mich.).

As the number of women running for office has grown, so too has the gender gap between the parties. Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillary Clinton to speak at Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders summit More than half of eligible Latinos voted in 2020, setting record Fox News signs Trey Gowdy, Dan Bongino for new shows MORE beat President TrumpDonald TrumpProject Veritas surveilled government officials to expose anti-Trump sentiments: report Cheney: Fox News has 'a particular obligation' to refute election fraud claims The Memo: What now for anti-Trump Republicans? MORE by about 13 points in 2016 among women, while the gap expanded in 2018, with women voting for Democratic candidates over Republican candidates 59 percent to 40 percent.

The 2020 presidential election is poised to expand the margin even further, with former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenFauci says school should be open 'full blast' five days a week in the fall Overnight Defense: Military sexual assault reform bill has votes to pass in Senate l First active duty service member arrested over Jan. 6 riot l Israeli troops attack Gaza Strip Immigration experts say GOP senators questioned DHS secretary with misleading chart MORE leading Trump among women in a number of polls, Bloomberg reported.

With racism and police brutality dominating the headlines, women of color in particular are looking to make inroads in November, building on gains in 2018.

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“We have been let down by so many of our elected officials,” Democratic candidate Adia Winfrey, who is running in Alabama’s 3rd District, told Bloomberg. “Because we are having these conversations I think people are becoming more aware of their biases.”

Winfrey, who is Black, is also one of 86 women running this year after losing in 2018. She lost a primary in 2018 to Jesse Smith, who went on to lose to Rep. Mike RogersMichael (Mike) Dennis RogersFive questions about Biden withdrawal from Afghanistan Congress brings back corrupt, costly, and inequitably earmarks Biden defense budget criticized by Republicans, progressives alike MORE (R-Ala.), but is running unopposed in the primary this year, according to Bloomberg.

Similarly, Gina Ortiz Jones is running for Texas’s 23rd District after losing in 2018 to Rep. Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden, Congress drawn into pipeline cyberattack, violence in Israel Pence autobiography coming from Simon & Schuster Prince Harry joins Aspen Institute commission on misinformation MORE (R-Texas), who is retiring at the end of his term.

“There is not enough folks in these leadership positions that have the experiences of the people being represented,” she told Bloomberg.