Most in new poll say Biden running mate won't influence their vote

Most in new poll say Biden running mate won't influence their vote
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A majority of U.S. voters said presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenHarris to host virtual Hollywood campaign event co-chaired by Reese Witherspoon, Mindy Kaling Trump plans to accept Republican nomination from White House lawn US seizes four vessels loaded with Iranian fuel MORE’s choice of running mate will have no impact on their vote in November, according to a new Politico-Morning Consult poll.

Fifty-four percent of respondents said the selection will not affect their vote, compared to 20 percent who said it will have a minor impact and 16 percent who said it would have a major impact.

Forty-five percent of Democrats surveyed said they believed it was important to select a person of color. Only 36 percent said the same in April, before the police killing of George Floyd and a series of protests across the nation against racism and police brutality.

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The former vice president has pledged to name a woman, and top contenders reportedly include Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisHarris to host virtual Hollywood campaign event co-chaired by Reese Witherspoon, Mindy Kaling Democrats hammer Trump for entertaining false birther theory about Harris Hillicon Valley: 'Fortnite' owner sues Apple after game is removed from App Store | Federal agencies seize, dismantle cryptocurrency campaigns of major terrorist organizations MORE (D-Calif.), former national security adviser Susan Rice and Rep. Val DemingsValdez (Val) Venita DemingsBlack women are ambitious — that's why we need more in office GOP lawmaker: 'Pretty cool' Harris has a shot at being the 'most powerful person in the world' How Biden decided on Harris MORE (D-Fla.). Another contender, Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharElection security advocates see strong ally in Harris The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - The choice: Biden-Harris vs. Trump-Pence California Democrats back Yang after he expresses disappointment over initial DNC lineup MORE (D-Minn.), withdrew herself from consideration in June, saying it should go to a woman of color.

“You cannot assume the activism we see on the streets is going to translate into voting. You cannot take anything for granted,” Karen Finney, who served as a communications adviser to Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonUSPS warns Pennsylvania mail-in ballots may not be delivered in time to be counted Senate leaves until September without coronavirus relief deal Gloria Steinem: Selection of Kamala Harris recognizes that 'black women ... are the heart and soul of the Democratic Party' MORE’s presidential campaign in 2016, told Politico. “This would not be the first time we’d have a person of color on the ticket, and I hope it reminds [voters] that that’s part of how Democrats win.”

Democratic strategist Joel Payne, however, said he doesn't "see anyone going into a voting booth thinking about a VP candidate” and said the polling indicated Biden should focus on a selection that does not hurt his standing in the polls. Running mates “can be a threat that can hurt the ticket — look at John McCainJohn Sidney McCainDemocrats hammer Trump for entertaining false birther theory about Harris Trump rips Bill Maher as 'exhausted, gaunt and weak' The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - The choice: Biden-Harris vs. Trump-Pence MORE and Sarah Palin in 2008,” he added.

Pollsters surveyed 1,992 registered voters from July 10 to 12. The poll has a 2-point margin of error, with higher margins for the subsamples.