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Michelle Obama, Sanders, Kasich to be featured on first night of Democratic convention: report

Michelle Obama, Sanders, Kasich to be featured on first night of Democratic convention: report
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Former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaObamas describe meeting Prince Philip in statement mourning his death Overnight Defense: Trump-era land mine policy unchanged amid review | Biden spending outline coming Friday | First lady sets priorities for relaunched military families initiative Jill Biden unveils next phase of military families program MORE, former Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R) and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden's policies are playing into Trump's hands Hillicon Valley: Amazon wins union election — says 'our employees made the choice' On The Money: Biden .5T budget proposes major hike in social programs | GOP bashes border, policing provisions MORE (I-Vt.) will reportedly be featured speakers on the first night of the Democratic National Convention.

The lineup, which represents a broad ideological cross-section, is part of a broader theme of unity against President TrumpDonald TrumpGaetz was denied meeting with Trump: CNN Federal Reserve chair: Economy would have been 'so much worse' without COVID-19 relief bills Police in California city declare unlawful assembly amid 'white lives matter' protest MORE and in support of presumptive Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenFederal Reserve chair: Economy would have been 'so much worse' without COVID-19 relief bills Biden to meet Monday with bipartisan lawmakers about infrastructure Jill Biden gives shout out to Champ, Major on National Pet Day MORE, a source who has seen convention plans told CNN. Sanders, a one-time presidential candidate himself, is a standard-bearer within the party’s progressive wing. Kasich is a vocal GOP critic of Trump, a demographic the party hopes to attract in November. And Michelle Obama is widely popular across the party.

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOn The Money: Biden .5T budget proposes major hike in social programs | GOP bashes border, policing provisions Overnight Defense: Biden proposes 3B defense budget | Criticism comes in from left and right | Pentagon moves toward new screening for extremists POW/MIA flag moved back atop White House MORE (D-Mass.) and 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonClose the avenues of foreign meddling Pelosi planned on retiring until Trump won election: report Pence autobiography coming from Simon & Schuster MORE, meanwhile, are expected to speak Wednesday, Aug. 19, according to Axios. Other expected speakers include Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaBiden is thinking about building that wall — and that's a good thing White House races clock to beat GOP attacks On North Korea, Biden should borrow from Trump's Singapore declaration MORE and Sen. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthPolitical disenfranchisement is fueling environmental injustice Tammy Duckworth pressures postal service board on firing DeJoy Biden says Cabinet 'looks like America' at first meeting MORE (D-Ill.), a contender to be Biden's running mate. Virginia Del. Danica Roem (D) is also a possible speaker, and a source familiar with the convention told Politico that Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezNew York City's suicide mission should alarm the entire nation Marjorie Taylor Greene rakes in over .2M in first quarter The strategy Biden needs to pass his infrastructure plan MORE (D-N.Y.) “will have some role.”

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The plans come as the coronavirus pandemic has forced an all-virtual convention. Biden was originally set to personally travel to Milwaukee to accept the party's nomination but will now accept it remotely from Delaware. The convention, already delayed a month, will take place Aug. 17-20, with two hours of events per night.

"There won't be the hoopla. There won't be the cheering and yelling,” former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell (D), a friend of Biden’s and a former Democratic National Committee chairman, told Politico. “But people are interested and I think they'll listen. And because we have so many people who've been in the public eye this year and so many in the past, like the Obamas and the Clintons and people like that, we have a terrific lineup."

A Biden adviser told Politico the convention is placing less emphasis on securing big names this year.

“We want to have as few elected officials as possible,” the adviser said. “Every one of these politicians — they give them three minutes but then they take 15. We are trying to avoid that. There will be a lot of video and a lot of regular people.”