Michelle Obama, Sanders, Kasich to be featured on first night of Democratic convention: report

Michelle Obama, Sanders, Kasich to be featured on first night of Democratic convention: report
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Former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaObamas are 'most admired' man and woman in world: poll John Legend: Americans may have to think about leaving country if Trump reelected Black stars reimagine 'Friends' to get out the vote MORE, former Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R) and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSirota reacts to report of harassment, doxing by Harris supporters Republicans not immune to the malady that hobbled Democrats The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Republicans lawmakers rebuke Trump on election MORE (I-Vt.) will reportedly be featured speakers on the first night of the Democratic National Convention.

The lineup, which represents a broad ideological cross-section, is part of a broader theme of unity against President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal prosecutor speaks out, says Barr 'has brought shame' on Justice Dept. Former Pence aide: White House staffers discussed Trump refusing to leave office Progressive group buys domain name of Trump's No. 1 Supreme Court pick MORE and in support of presumptive Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenFormer Pence aide: White House staffers discussed Trump refusing to leave office Progressive group buys domain name of Trump's No. 1 Supreme Court pick Bloomberg rolls out M ad buy to boost Biden in Florida MORE, a source who has seen convention plans told CNN. Sanders, a one-time presidential candidate himself, is a standard-bearer within the party’s progressive wing. Kasich is a vocal GOP critic of Trump, a demographic the party hopes to attract in November. And Michelle Obama is widely popular across the party.

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOvernight Defense: Appeals court revives House lawsuit against military funding for border wall | Dems push for limits on transferring military gear to police | Lawmakers ask for IG probe into Pentagon's use of COVID-19 funds On The Money: Half of states deplete funds for Trump's 0 unemployment expansion | EU appealing ruling in Apple tax case | House Democrats include more aid for airlines in coronavirus package Warren, Khanna request IG investigation into Pentagon's use of coronavirus funds MORE (D-Mass.) and 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBloomberg rolls out M ad buy to boost Biden in Florida Hillicon Valley: Productivity, fatigue, cybersecurity emerge as top concerns amid pandemic | Facebook critics launch alternative oversight board | Google to temporarily bar election ads after polls close Trump pledges to make Juneteenth a federal holiday, designate KKK a terrorist group in pitch to Black voters MORE, meanwhile, are expected to speak Wednesday, Aug. 19, according to Axios. Other expected speakers include Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaDemocrats ramp up pressure on Lieberman to drop out of Georgia Senate race The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden on Trump: 'He'll leave' l GOP laywers brush off Trump's election remarks l Obama's endorsements Trump pledges to make Juneteenth a federal holiday, designate KKK a terrorist group in pitch to Black voters MORE and Sen. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthMcConnell focuses on confirming judicial nominees with COVID-19 talks stalled Biden courts veterans amid fallout from Trump military controversies John Fogerty: 'Confounding' that Trump campaign played 'Fortunate Son' at rally MORE (D-Ill.), a contender to be Biden's running mate. Virginia Del. Danica Roem (D) is also a possible speaker, and a source familiar with the convention told Politico that Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOn The Money: Anxious Democrats push for vote on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi, Mnuchin ready to restart talks | Weekly jobless claims increase | Senate treads close to shutdown deadline McCarthy says there will be a peaceful transition if Biden wins Anxious Democrats amp up pressure for vote on COVID-19 aid MORE (D-N.Y.) “will have some role.”

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The plans come as the coronavirus pandemic has forced an all-virtual convention. Biden was originally set to personally travel to Milwaukee to accept the party's nomination but will now accept it remotely from Delaware. The convention, already delayed a month, will take place Aug. 17-20, with two hours of events per night.

"There won't be the hoopla. There won't be the cheering and yelling,” former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell (D), a friend of Biden’s and a former Democratic National Committee chairman, told Politico. “But people are interested and I think they'll listen. And because we have so many people who've been in the public eye this year and so many in the past, like the Obamas and the Clintons and people like that, we have a terrific lineup."

A Biden adviser told Politico the convention is placing less emphasis on securing big names this year.

“We want to have as few elected officials as possible,” the adviser said. “Every one of these politicians — they give them three minutes but then they take 15. We are trying to avoid that. There will be a lot of video and a lot of regular people.”