Willie Brown: Kamala Harris should 'politely decline' any offer to be Biden's running mate

Former San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown (D) advised Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisButtigieg stands in as Pence for Harris's debate practice First presidential debate to cover coronavirus, Supreme Court Harris joins women's voter mobilization event also featuring Pelosi, Gloria Steinem, Jane Fonda MORE (D-Calif.) to "politely decline" any offer to be presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenOmar fires back at Trump over rally remarks: 'This is my country' Trump mocks Biden appearance, mask use ahead of first debate Trump attacks Omar for criticizing US: 'How did you do where you came from?' MORE’s running mate.

Brown wrote that the vice presidency would likely hinder any further political ambitions for Harris.

“Historically, the vice presidency has often ended up being a dead end. For every George H.W. Bush, who ascended from the job to the presidency, there’s an Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreCruz says Senate Republicans likely have votes to confirm Trump Supreme Court nominee 4 inconclusive Electoral College results that challenged our democracy Fox's Napolitano: 2000 election will look like 'child's play' compared to 2020 legal battles MORE, who never got there,” Brown wrote in an op-ed for the San Francisco Examiner.

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Brown, who served as mayor from 1996 to 2004, has said he briefly dated Harris while she was an Alameda County, Calif., deputy district attorney. As Speaker of the California Assembly, he later appointed her to positions on the state Unemployment Insurance Appeals Board and the California Medical Assistance Commission.

The former mayor further noted that Biden and his vice president would almost certainly take office amid a continued economic downturn.

“The next few years promise to be a very bumpy ride,” he wrote. “Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaMichelle Obama and Jennifer Lopez exchange Ginsburg memories Pence defends Trump's 'obligation' to nominate new Supreme Court justice The militia menace MORE and the Democrats saved the nation from economic collapse when he took office, and their reward was a blowout loss in the 2010 midterm elections.”

Brown suggested Harris could be more effective, and better positioned for an ongoing political career, as U.S. attorney general.

“Given the department’s current disarray under William BarrBill BarrProsecutor says no charges in Michigan toilet voting display Judge rules Snowden to give up millions from book, speeches The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Washington on edge amid SCOTUS vacancy MORE, just showing up and being halfway sane will make the new AG a hero,” he wrote. “Best of all, being attorney general would give Harris enough distance from the White House to still be a viable candidate for the top slot in 2024 or 2028, no matter what the state of the nation.”

Biden has promised to name a woman as his running mate. In addition to Harris, other contenders reportedly include Sens. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthMcConnell focuses on confirming judicial nominees with COVID-19 talks stalled Biden courts veterans amid fallout from Trump military controversies John Fogerty: 'Confounding' that Trump campaign played 'Fortunate Son' at rally MORE (D-Ill.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenHarris joins women's voter mobilization event also featuring Pelosi, Gloria Steinem, Jane Fonda Judd Gregg: The Kamala threat — the Californiaization of America GOP set to release controversial Biden report MORE (D-Mass.), Rep. Karen BassKaren Ruth BassPatients are dying unnecessarily from organ donation policy failures Hispanic caucus report takes stock of accomplishments with eye toward 2021 Bogeymen of the far left deserve a place in any Biden administration MORE (D-Calif.), former national security adviser Susan Rice and Michigan Gov. Gretchen WhitmerGretchen WhitmerCoronavirus lockdowns work Michigan resident puts toilet on front lawn with sign 'Place mail in ballots here' Sunday shows preview: Justice Ginsburg dies, sparking partisan battle over vacancy before election MORE (D).