Campaign

Trump campaign spox rips GOP congressman over rejection of QAnon conspiracy

A campaign spokesperson for President Trump took aim at a GOP congressman on Wednesday after the lawmaker dismissed the QAnon conspiracy theory in a Twitter post.

Matt Wolking, deputy communications director for Trump's reelection campaign, called on Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) to publicly reject the credibility of the dossier authored by former British intelligence agent Christopher Steele, which allies of the president have argued was the basis for the Russia investigation lead by former special counsel Robert Mueller. 

Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz told members of Congress that the opposition research compiled by Steele did not prompt the investigation into the Trump campaign and its ties to Russia. 

"When will @RepKinzinger condemn the Steele Dossier fabrications and conspiracy theories pushed by Democrats?" Wolking wrote, adding, "That actually WAS Russian propaganda."

His tweet came in response to a tweet earlier in the day from Kinzinger, who called the QAnon conspiracy a product of "Russian propaganda or a basement dweller" following the victory of Marjorie Taylor Greene, a QAnon supporter, in the GOP primary runoff for Georgia's 14th District on Tuesday night.

The congressman was the first GOP lawmaker to criticize Greene's win, asserting there is "no place in Congress for these conspiracies." 

Following Greene's win, Trump took to Twitter on Wednesday to voice his support for the GOP candidate, calling her a "future Republican star." 

"Congratulations to future Republican Star Marjorie Taylor Greene on a big Congressional primary win in Georgia against a very tough and smart opponent," Trump tweeted. "Marjorie is strong on everything and never gives up - a real WINNER!"

Requests for further comment from Wolking and the Trump campaign were not immediately returned. Kinzinger's office also did not immediately return a request for comment from The Hill. 

The QAnon conspiracy, which began shortly before the November election in 2016, claims without evidence that top Democratic officials, major celebrities and figures in the media are working together to bring down Trump and are tied to an international child sex trafficking ring. The theory is based on posts by a mysterious individual or group of individuals on an anonymous internet forum.

The posts have made numerous predictions that have not come to fruition, including claiming that Trump's 2016 opponent Hillary Clinton would be arrested as a result of the now-shuttered Russia investigation.

Greene is expected to win the general election in her red district in November. She won 60 percent of the vote in Tuesday's runoff election.

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