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Democrats featuring 'rising stars' in convention keynotes

The Democratic National Convention will highlight 17 “rising stars” in its keynote address Tuesday evening rather than the traditional single speaker.

Scheduled speakers include former Georgia gubernatorial candidate and voting rights advocate Stacey Abrams, as well as Rep. Conor Lamb (D-Pa.), who was an early backer of former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPutin says he's optimistic about working with Biden ahead of planned meeting How the infrastructure bill can help close the digital divide Biden meets Queen Elizabeth for first time as president MORE. Lamb's victory has been cited as a model for Democrats to compete in districts won by President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump DOJ demanded metadata on 73 phone numbers and 36 email addresses, Apple says Putin says he's optimistic about working with Biden ahead of planned meeting Biden meets Queen Elizabeth for first time as president MORE.

Other scheduled speakers during the keynote include several state lawmakers, such as Pennsylvania state Rep. Malcolm Kenyatta, Nevada state Sen. Yvanna Cancela and Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried.

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"Amidst all of the chaos and crises our nation is facing, Democrats are focused on finding new and innovative ways to engage more Americans than ever before — because that's how we'll mobilize the nation to defeat Donald Trump in November," convention CEO Joe Solmonese said in a statement. "The convention keynote has always been the bellwether for the future of our party and our nation, and when Americans tune in next week they'll find the smart, steady leadership we need to meet this critical moment."

The keynote speaker's slot is viewed as a springboard for a higher profile within the party. Past keynote speakers at the Democratic convention include then-Illinois state Sen. Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaBiden tries to erase Trump's 'America First' on world stage Queen Elizabeth will need to call upon her charm for Biden's visit Is Biden the new FDR or LBJ? History says no MORE in 2004, then-San Antonio Mayor Julian CastroJulian CastroMore GOP-led states risk corporate backlash like Georgia's More than 200 Obama officials sign letter supporting Biden's stimulus plan OVERNIGHT ENERGY: McEachin signals interest in Biden administration environment role | Haaland, eyed for Interior, stresses need for Native American representation | Haaland backers ask Udall to step aside in bid for Interior post MORE in 2012 and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenMark Cuban: ProPublica 'not being honest' about taxes on wealthy On The Money: Bipartisan Senate group rules out tax hikes on infrastructure | New report reignites push for wealth tax New report reignites push for wealth tax MORE (D-Mass.) in 2016.

Initially scheduled for Milwaukee, the 2020 Democratic convention was moved to an entirely virtual format due to the coronavirus pandemic. Other speakers slated for Tuesday night include former second lady Jill Biden and former President Clinton.

Biden and his running mate, Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisMeghan McCain: Harris 'sounded like a moron' discussing immigration I visited the border and the vice president should too Texas governor announces plan to build southern border wall MORE (D-Calif.), will both deliver their addresses from the Chase Center in Wilmington, Del. Other scheduled speakers include Obama, former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaJill Biden, Kate Middleton to meet this week Jill Biden to focus on military families on foreign trip Book claims Trump believed Democrats would replace Biden with Hillary Clinton or Michelle Obama in 2020 election MORE, former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump asks Biden to give Putin his 'warmest regards' Huma Abedin announces book deal Mystery surrounds Justice's pledge on journalist records MORE, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezSimmering Democratic tensions show signs of boiling over Out-of-touch Democrats running scared of progressives Progressives rally behind Omar while accusing her critics of bias MORE (D-N.Y.), Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOvernight Energy: Biden seeks to reassert US climate leadership | President to 'repeal or replace' Trump decision removing protections for Tongass | Administration proposes its first offshore wind lease sale On The Money: Democrats wary of emerging bipartisan infrastructure deal, warn of time crunch Out-of-touch Democrats running scared of progressives MORE (I-Vt.) and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R).