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Sanders saw Harris as Biden's best pick: report

Sanders saw Harris as Biden's best pick: report
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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersHouse Democrats pass sweeping .9T COVID-19 relief bill with minimum wage hike House set for tight vote on COVID-19 relief package On The Money: Democrats scramble to save minimum wage hike | Personal incomes rise, inflation stays low after stimulus burst MORE (I-Vt.) believed the strongest choice for former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHouse Democrats pass sweeping .9T COVID-19 relief bill with minimum wage hike Biden to hold virtual bilateral meeting with Mexican president More than 300 charged in connection to Capitol riot MORE’s running mate would be Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisExclusive: How Obama went to bat for Warren To unite America, Biden administration must brace for hate Democratic strategists start women-run media consulting firm MORE (D-Calif.), his eventual choice, Bloomberg reported.

Although his Senate colleague was not the contender whose views most closely matched his own, Sanders reportedly believed she would be the choice who best positioned the ticket to defeat President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden to hold virtual bilateral meeting with Mexican president More than 300 charged in connection to Capitol riot Trump Jr.: There are 'plenty' of GOP incumbents who should be challenged MORE

Sanders endorsed Biden soon after withdrawing from the race, and the Vermont senator has frequently appealed to his supporters to help elect the former vice president and hold him accountable from the left.

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Biden’s and Sanders’s teams collaborated on six policy task forces that helped shape the party platform, although two of Sanders’s signature proposals, the Green New Deal and "Medicare for All," did not make the cut.

While Sanders said on NBC’s “Meet the Press” Sunday that his wing of the party “surely did not” get all of their agenda items, he hailed the possibilities of a Biden administration if it implemented the proposals.

“Joe Biden will become the most progressive president since Franklin Delano Roosevelt. And that, in this moment, is what we need,” he said Sunday.

Sanders also addressed the virtual Democratic National Convention Monday, striking a note of unity similar to other headliners.

“As long as I am here, I will work with progressives, with moderates and, yes, with conservatives to preserve this nation from a threat that so many of our heroes fought and died to defeat,” he said.

Sanders has emphasized the need for unity among some dissatisfaction from his supporters. Two of his onetime campaign surrogates, Reps. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibSix ways to visualize a divided America Jamaal Bowman's mother dies of COVID-19: 'I share her legacy with all of you' Democrats urge Biden FDA to drop in-person rule for abortion pill MORE (D-Mich.) and Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaOvernight Defense: Biden sends message with Syria airstrike | US intel points to Saudi crown prince in Khashoggi killing | Pentagon launches civilian-led sexual assault commission Biden 'disappointed' in Senate parliamentarian ruling but 'respects' decision Democrats look to improve outreach to Asian and Latino communities MORE (D-Calif.), voted against the party platform.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezBudget Committee chair pledges to raise minimum wage: 'Hold me to it' Democrats scramble to rescue minimum wage hike Exclusive: How Obama went to bat for Warren MORE (D-N.Y.), who helped develop the task force recommendations, has endorsed the ticket but criticized the notion that convention speaker and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R) should play a role in determining the future of the Democratic Party.