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The Hill's Convention Report: Biden's big night | Steve Bannon's fall | Pelosi weighs in on Mass. Senate primary

The Hill's Convention Report: Biden's big night | Steve Bannon's fall | Pelosi weighs in on Mass. Senate primary
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Welcome to The Hill’s Convention Report, your daily rundown on all the latest news during the Democratic and Republican National Conventions. Did someone forward this to you? Click here to subscribe.

We’re Julia Manchester, Max Greenwood and Jonathan Easley. Here’s what we’re watching today on the convention front. 

LEADING THE DAY: The Democratic convention’s grand finale

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When Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden holds massive cash advantage over Trump ahead of Election Day Tax records show Trump maintains a Chinese bank account: NYT Trump plays video of Biden, Harris talking about fracking at Pennsylvania rally MORE formally accepts the Democratic presidential nomination tonight, it will mark the culmination of a political career that has spanned nearly half a century. 

The former Delaware senator and vice president has sought the party’s presidential nod before 2020 — not once, but twice. The first time, in 1988, ended in shambles after Biden was caught plagiarizing a speech from a U.K. politician. The second time, in 2008, he was bested by a junior senator from Illinois, who went on to tap Biden as his running mate.

Now, Biden will finally have the chance to say what he’s waited decades to say: that he accepts the Democratic Party’s nomination for president of the United States.

There will be some buildup to Biden’s remarks tonight. Sens. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDurbin signals he isn't interested in chairing Judiciary Committee Booker 'outs' Cruz as vegan; Cruz jokingly decries 'scurrilous attack' Why Latinos should oppose Barrett confirmation MORE (D-N.J.), Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne Baldwin Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing Baldwin calls for Senate hearing on CDC response to meatpacking plant coronavirus outbreak Democrats demand answers from Labor Department on CDC recommendations for meatpacking plant MORE (D-Wis.) and Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthAmy Coney Barrett's extreme views put women's rights in jeopardy Trump slight against Gold Star families adds to military woes McConnell focuses on confirming judicial nominees with COVID-19 talks stalled MORE (D-Ill.) will have their turns to speak, as will Biden’s successor in the Senate, Chris CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsSchumer says he had 'serious talk' with Feinstein, declines to comment on Judiciary role Durbin signals he isn't interested in chairing Judiciary Committee Push to expand Supreme Court faces Democratic buzzsaw MORE (D-Del.). The speaking lineup will also feature three of Biden’s former presidential primary opponents, Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegLGBTQ voters must show up at the polls, or risk losing progress Buttigieg says it's time to 'turn the page' on Trump administration Sunday shows preview: Coronavirus cases surge in the Midwest; Trump hits campaign trail after COVID-19 MORE, Andrew YangAndrew YangPelosi spars with CNN's Blitzer over COVID-19 aid: 'You really don't know what you're talking about' The shape of guaranteed income Biden's latest small business outreach is just ... awful MORE and former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergEverytown hits GOP on gun safety in closing .5M battleground ad barrage A closing argument: Why voters cannot trust Trump on healthcare Biden campaign swamps Trump on TV airwaves MORE, who sought in his few months on the campaign trail to cut into Biden’s coalition of moderate voters.

Biden’s son Hunter is also set to speak on Thursday — a decision that is already providing Republicans with political ammunition. They’ve long sought to portray him as a corrupt figure who used his father’s position in the Obama administration to his financial advantage.

And Biden’s set to score another celebrity endorsement from Golden State Warriors point guard Steph Curry and his wife Ayesha, who will both speak during the convention on Thursday night.

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RED ALERT BATTLEGROUND STATE POLLS:

A few interesting surveys from the swing states are out today…

In Pennsylvania, a Muhlenberg College survey finds Biden leading Trump 49 percent to 45 percent. That’s within the survey’s margin of error. Biden at one point last month had a nearly 8-point lead over Trump in the RealClearPolitics average of Pennsylvania. Now it is down to a 5.7-point advantage. Trump was in Pennsylvania for a rally on Thursday near Biden’s hometown.

And in Minnesota, a new Trafalgar Group survey finds Trump and Biden are tied. Minnesota is one of the few states Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump jokingly blames 'Crooked Hillary' after his rally mic stops working The Hill's Campaign Report: Two weeks to the election l Biden leads in new polls as debate looms l Trump pressures DOJ on Hunter Biden Trump remarks put pressure on Barr MORE won in 2016 where the Trump campaign believes they can be on offense. Recent polling has been moving their way.

But one major hurdle for Trump — Biden has the support of a majority of voters who didn’t cast a ballot in 2016, according to a new USC Dornsife poll. That’s helped Biden open up an 11 point national lead overall.

MORE REPUBLICANS FOR BIDEN:

The Democratic convention has heavily featured Republicans and former Republicans for Biden. A few dozen more came out today — more than 70 former national security officials who served under Presidents Trump, George W. Bush, George H.W. Bush and Ronald Reagan have announced their support for Biden. 

BANNON’S FALL:

Some strange and shocking news around former White House chief strategist Stephen Bannon, who was also a top adviser to Trump’s 2016 campaign:

Bannon and three other men were arrested on Thursday and charged with defrauding hundreds of thousands of donors who sent money to a private group claiming they would build the border wall. The group “We Build the Wall” raised more than $25 million.

It’s the latest twist in Bannon’s up-and-down saga. He was banished from the White House and Trump’s inner circle for leaking stories to author Michael Wolff about Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden holds massive cash advantage over Trump ahead of Election Day Tax records show Trump maintains a Chinese bank account: NYT Trump plays video of Biden, Harris talking about fracking at Pennsylvania rally MORE Jr. for the book “Fire and Fury.” That also cost him his job as chairman of Breitbart News. Recently, Bannon returned to Washington where he’s broadcast a radio show supporting Trump through the impeachment trial and coronavirus pandemic.

The Hill: Five takeaways from Bannon’s indictment.

More legal action around the president…

A federal judge in New York has dismissed Trump’s latest effort to block a grand jury subpoena for his tax returns and a trove of other financial documents. John Kruzel has the story.

PELOSI STEPS INTO MASSACHUSETTS BATTLE ROYALE 

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: McConnell says he would give Trump-backed coronavirus deal a Senate vote | Pelosi, Mnuchin see progress, but no breakthrough | Trump, House lawyers return to court in fight over financial records Progress, but no breakthrough, on coronavirus relief McConnell says he would give Trump-backed coronavirus deal a vote in Senate MORE threw her endorsement behind Rep. Joe KennedyJoseph (Joe) Patrick KennedyPresidential debate proves the power of the climate movement Democrats see fundraising spike following Ginsburg death Massachusetts town clerk resigns after delays to primary vote count MORE III’s primary challenge against Sen. Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Democrats push expansion of offshore wind, block offshore drilling with ocean energy bill | Poll: Two-thirds of voters support Biden climate plan | Biden plan lags Green New Deal in fighting emissions from homes Biden plan lags Green New Deal in fighting emissions from homes Senate Republicans offer constitutional amendment to block Supreme Court packing MORE on Thursday, sparking major backlash from progressives. In a video, Pelosi said she was supporting Kennedy because he “knows that to achieve progressive change, you must be on the front lines, leading movements of people.”

But the expression of support sent shockwaves through progressive groups, calling the move hypocritical. 

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“This move reeks of hypocrisy: the party is setting one standard for progressives and one entirely different standard for the establishment,” Alexandra Rojas, the executive director of the progressive group Justice Democrats, said. 

“We’re honestly shocked she had the gall to invoke social movements in endorsing Joe Kennedy,” the Sunrise Movement said in another statement. “This is endorsement is embarrassing because it plainly reveals a ridiculous double standard.” 

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Democrats push expansion of offshore wind, block offshore drilling with ocean energy bill | Poll: Two-thirds of voters support Biden climate plan | Biden plan lags Green New Deal in fighting emissions from homes Biden plan lags Green New Deal in fighting emissions from homes Ocasio-Cortez rolls out Twitch channel to urge voting MORE also reacted to the news, asking when the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) would reverse its blacklist policy, which seeks to block consultants from the party for aiding and working for primary challengers. 

The DCCC previously has said it offered support to all incumbents, including Ocasio-Cortez and other progressives who unseated incumbents in 2018. 

More Senate campaigns news...the Senate GOP campaign arm outraised their Democratic counterparts in July.

FROM THE HOUSE:

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DCCC chairwoman Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosCalls grow for Democrats to ramp up spending in Texas House Democrats target Hispanic voters in battlegrounds with new barrage of ads Republican fears grow over rising Democratic tide MORE (D-Ill.) told The Hill’s Reid Wilson today that Democrats are likely to add to their majority in the House next year, and that the party is eyeing long-held Republican seats in states like Alaska, Indiana and Montana.

In an interview for The Hill’s Big Questions series, Bustos said Democrats have taken aim at 31 Republican-held seats this year, a number that is likely to expand in the 10 weeks before Election Day. 

MARK YOUR CALENDARS:

We’re 4 days from the beginning of the Republican National Convention, 40 days from the first presidential debate and 75 days out from Election Day. 

The Democratic National Convention’s main programming is slated to start tonight at 9 p.m. and will run until 11 p.m. Here’s a look at the speaker lineup (exact times TBD):