House Democrats' campaign arm reserves $2.6M in ads in competitive districts

House Democrats' campaign arm reserves $2.6M in ads in competitive districts
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The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) reserved $2.6 million in ads in competitive House districts, taking aim at races in states including Texas, Georgia, and New York. 

The new reservations, which were first reported by Politico on Tuesday, underscore Democrats' urgency to not only protect their majority in the lower chamber but flip seats that would normally be considered safe for Republicans. 

The committee spent the most money in Texas, investing $1.029 million in television ads in the San Antonio media market, which is home to Rep. Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyPelosi must go — the House is in dire need of new leadership GOP lawmakers want answers from Disney on Mulan, China Freedom Caucus member Chip Roy touts bipartisanship in first campaign ad MORE's (R) district, as well as retiring GOP Rep. Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdHillicon Valley: Oracle confirms deal with TikTok to be 'trusted technology provider' | QAnon spreads across globe, shadowing COVID-19 | VA hit by data breach impacting 46,000 veterans House approves bill to secure internet-connected federal devices against cyber threats House Democrats' campaign arm reserves .6M in ads in competitive districts MORE's seat. Roy is facing off against former state Sen. Wendy Davis (D) in the 21st district. The non-partisan Cook Political Report rates Roy's race as a "toss-up," and the race to replace Hurd as "lean Democratic."

In Atlanta's media market, the committee spent $771,000 to reserve television ads, hoping to defend freshman Rep. Lucy McBathLucia (Lucy) Kay McBathThis week: House returns for pre-election sprint House Democrats' campaign arm reserves .6M in ads in competitive districts Black Lives Matter movement to play elevated role at convention MORE's (D-Ga.) seat in the state's 6th congressional district against former Rep. Karen HandelKaren Christine HandelHouse Democrats' campaign arm reserves .6M in ads in competitive districts Black Lives Matter movement to play elevated role at convention QAnon backer Marjorie Taylor Greene wins Georgia GOP runoff MORE (R-Ga.). Cook rates the race as "lean Democratic." The buy is also meant to help Democratic efforts to flip retiring GOP Rep. Rob WoodallWilliam (Rob) Robert WoodallHouse Democrats' campaign arm reserves .6M in ads in competitive districts Hispanic Caucus campaign arm endorses slate of non-Hispanic candidates Democrats go big on diversity with new House recruits MORE's (R) seat in Georgia's 7th district, which Cook rates as "lean Democratic." 

Additionally, the committee has also taken aim at a number of races in New York, Iowa and New Mexico. In New York, the DCCC spent $650,000 in the New York City media market in an effort to flip retiring GOP Rep. Peter King's seat. It also spent $90,000 in Indianapolis to flip retiring GOP Rep. Susan BrooksSusan Wiant BrooksThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump, GOP allies prepare for SCOTUS nomination this week The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Washington on edge amid SCOTUS vacancy House Democrats' campaign arm reserves .6M in ads in competitive districts MORE's seat, $30,000 in New Mexico for Democratic Rep. Xochitl Torres Small and $35,000 for Rep. Abby FinkenauerAbby Lea FinkenauerTrump asked Chamber of Commerce to reconsider Democratic endorsements: report House Democrats' campaign arm reserves .6M in ads in competitive districts GOP leader says he doesn't want Chamber's endorsement: 'They have sold out' MORE (D) in Iowa. 

Prior to the latest reservations, the DCCC had reserved $36 million in airtime in television markets that cover 31 Republican-held seats Democrats are targeting this year and the 42 most vulnerable Democrats. 

The committee's chairwoman, Rep. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosThe Hill's Campaign Report: Biden asks if public can trust vaccine from Trump ahead of Election Day | Oklahoma health officials raised red flags before Trump rally DCCC dropping million on voter education program Clark rolls out endorsements in assistant Speaker race MORE (D-Ill.), told The Hill last month she was confident her party would expand its majority in November. 

“My prediction as we sit here is we will not only hold on to this Democratic majority, we will grow it,” Bustos said. “We’ve got the right candidates and resources, and we are ready to mobilize even in the middle of a worldwide pandemic.”

“They’ve done none of the things that they promised to do — this time, rather than just run on a resume, run on a biography, they have to run on their record,” Emmer said. “That record is not good and they are going to lose their majority because of it.”