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Trump supporters chant 'Fill that seat' at North Carolina rally

The evening after the Supreme Court announced the death of late liberal Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgDemocrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Mitt Romney did not vote for Trump in 2020 election The Senate should evoke RBG in its confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett MORE, President TrumpDonald John TrumpJudge rules to not release Russia probe documents over Trump tweets Trump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo Obama to campaign for Biden in Florida MORE and his supporters chanted “Fill that seat” during a campaign rally in Fayetteville, N.C.

“You may agree, you may not disagree with her, but she was an inspiration to a tremendous amount of people; I say all Americans,” Trump said opening the rally, noting Ginsburg’s close relationship with late conservative Justice Antonin Scalia. 

Seconds later, Trump said: “So, Article II of our constitution says the president shall nominate justices of the Supreme Court.” 

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“I don’t think it can be any more clear, can it? I don’t think so,” Trump said to a cheering crowd. 

The president said his campaign may start selling shirts with the phrase “Fill that seat” and had the crowd vote on whether he should nominate a man or a woman by cheering. 

“Fill that seat, that’s the new chant now,” Trump said.  

Ginsburg’s death Friday evening immediately sparked a partisan battle over the fate of the vacancy on the conservative-majority court. 

Trump and Senate GOP leaders indicated they are eager to fill the seat, a reversal from 2016 when the Senate GOP blocked then-President Obama's nominee Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandDemocrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination The Senate should evoke RBG in its confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett Democrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein MORE arguing at the time that Supreme Court vacancies should not be filled in election years. 

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Some moderate Republicans, such as Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsDemocrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid Senate is leaning to the Democrats, big time, with a wave MORE (Maine), were less eager to weigh in. Collins indicated Saturday that she does not support a Senate vote this year, which Trump pointed out during the rally. 

“We have some senators that, you know,” Trump said. “I won’t say it, Susan, I won’t say it.”

Trump praised Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisGOP coronavirus bill blocked as deal remains elusive Senate is leaning to the Democrats, big time, with a wave Cunningham, Tillis locked in tight race in North Carolina: poll MORE (R-N.C.), another vulnerable Republican, for indicating he supports voting on a Trump nominee this year. GOP Sens. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallySenate is leaning to the Democrats, big time, with a wave Cunningham, Tillis locked in tight race in North Carolina: poll Senate Republicans offer constitutional amendment to block Supreme Court packing MORE (R-Ariz.) and Kelly LoefflerKelly LoefflerRepublicans scramble to shore up support in Ga. as Democrats gain Democrats make gains in Georgia Senate races: poll Senate Republicans offer constitutional amendment to block Supreme Court packing MORE (R-Ga.) — two more Republicans facing a tight reelection in swing states — have also endorsed moving to fill the vacancy this year.