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George Floyd's sister calls for change in new Biden ad

In a new ad released by Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenMinnesota certifies Biden victory Trump tells allies he plans to pardon Michael Flynn: report Biden says staff has spoken with Fauci: 'He's been very, very helpful' MORE's campaign on Wednesday, Bridgett Floyd, sister of George Floyd, calls for change and discusses the importance of voting after her brother was killed by police officers in Minneapolis. 

The ad is part of the Biden campaign’s efforts to increase Black support in key battleground states, including Minnesota, where George was killed. It will air nationally on television, radio and digital outlets.

In the 30-second ad called "Change," Floyd recalls Biden’s meeting with her family in June, saying he was “there to listen” and describing the Democratic presidential nominee as “very sincere.” 

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“Biden is the change that we need,” Floyd says. 

Floyd then talks about the importance of voting, saying that “your vote does matter. That one vote does make a difference.” 

Biden met privately with George Floyd’s family in June as mass protests calling for racial equality and police reform grew in the wake of his death, and he delivered an address at Floyd's funeral in Houston in which he sought a unifying tone. 

“We can’t turn away. We must not turn away,” Biden said in a video address from his home in Delaware to the Fountain of Praise Church in Houston. 

“We cannot leave this moment thinking we can once again turn away from racism that stings at our very soul, from systemic abuse that still plagues American life," he continued. 

Floyd died in May after now-former police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes while he was detained. Video of his death sparked outrage nationwide and led to continuous protests, with protesters demanding an end to police brutality and systemic racism in the U.S. 

Chauvin is facing multiple felony charges, including second-degree murder and manslaughter. He was released on Oct. 7 after posting a conditional bond that was set at $1 million and was allowed to establish residency outside of the state on Oct. 9.