Couple who shared QAnon theories donates $1 million to Trump

A couple who shared QAnon conspiracy theories recently donated $1 million in campaign contributions to President TrumpDonald TrumpGOP grapples with chaotic Senate primary in Pennsylvania ​​Trump social media startup receives commitment of billion from unidentified 'diverse group' of investors Iran thinks it has the upper hand in Vienna — here's why it doesn't MORE before their own fundraising event was cancelled, The Associated Press reported.

Campaign disclosures released Thursday night show that Trump’s joint fundraising effort with the Republican National Committee accepted $1.03 million from Michael and Caryn Borland, in late August before their fundraiser was canceled, according to the AP.

Their son contributed an additional $580,000 around that same time. 

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Vice President Pence decided not to attend the couple’s fundraiser in Bozeman, Mont., after it was reported that the couple shared social media posts of the baseless conspiracy theory, which alleges that a group of Democratic officials, members of the media and celebrities are part of a so-called deep state that are running a child sex trafficking ring.

QAnon followers believe that Trump is working to expose them. 

The movement began on the internet but has grown substantially in recent months, garnering support from some GOP congressional candidates, most notably Marjorie Taylor Greene, who is running to represent Georgia’s 14th congressional district and will most likely win the seat in Washington. The FBI designated the collection of individuals a domestic terror threat in 2019 because it had the potential to encourage violence. 

Pence instead held a rally for the Montana Republican Party. 

During a town hall on NBC News Thursday night, Trump refused to disavow the conspiracy theory, saying he knew nothing about it beyond that its supporters are “strongly against pedophilia.” 

“I know nothing about QAnon. I know very little,” Trump said. “You told me, but what you tell me doesn’t necessarily make it fact. I hate to say that.”

Trump had previously offered ambiguous comments on the group, telling reporters in August that he knew little about it, but understood that its supporters like him “very much” and “love America.”

After his remarks then, Pence was pressed on the theory and dismissed it “out of hand.” 

The Hill has reached out to the Trump campaign for comment.