SPONSORED:

Trump jokingly blames 'Crooked Hillary' after his rally mic stops working

Trump jokingly blames 'Crooked Hillary' after his rally mic stops working

President TrumpDonald TrumpSanders: Reinstating SALT deduction 'sends a terrible, terrible message' GOP braces for wild week with momentous vote One quick asylum fix: How Garland can help domestic violence survivors MORE jokingly blamed “Crooked Hillary” when his microphone stopped working at his Pennsylvania rally on Tuesday. 

The president appeared to experience technical difficulties when his microphone suddenly went out during his rally in Erie, Pa. Trump had been talking about the law enforcement endorsements his campaign received before the outage. 

He continued to talk before realizing the microphone was out as the crowd behind him started to look around. The president eventually turned to his left and pointed to the microphone, while mouthing “Mic.”

ADVERTISEMENT

A rallygoer yelled, "Fake news turn it back on!" according to a pool reporter, who indicated the microphone was not controlled by the press. 

When the microphone started working again, the crowd was chanting “Trump.”

“Is the mic ready? Yes,” the president said.

“I wonder who did that to our mic? I don't believe it was Joe. You know who it was? Crooked Hillary. It must've been,” he said, referring to 2016 Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMcConnell: Taliban could take over Afghanistan by 'the end of the year' Hillary Clinton: There must be a 'global reckoning' with disinformation Pelosi's archbishop calls for Communion to be withheld from public figures supporting abortion rights MORE.

Trump then continued with his speech.

The president has been traveling and holding rallies as Election Day now looms two weeks away. 

Trump will face Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenSanders: Reinstating SALT deduction 'sends a terrible, terrible message' GOP braces for wild week with momentous vote Shining a light on COINTELPRO's dangerous legacy MORE, who has taken a different approach by avoiding large gatherings due to the coronavirus pandemic that has infected more than 8.1 million and killed more than 220,000 Americans, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.