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Trump jokingly blames 'Crooked Hillary' after his rally mic stops working

Trump jokingly blames 'Crooked Hillary' after his rally mic stops working

President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden to nominate Linda Thomas-Greenfield for UN ambassador: reports Scranton dedicates 'Joe Biden Way' to honor president-elect Kasich: Republicans 'either in complete lockstep' or 'afraid' of Trump MORE jokingly blamed “Crooked Hillary” when his microphone stopped working at his Pennsylvania rally on Tuesday. 

The president appeared to experience technical difficulties when his microphone suddenly went out during his rally in Erie, Pa. Trump had been talking about the law enforcement endorsements his campaign received before the outage. 

He continued to talk before realizing the microphone was out as the crowd behind him started to look around. The president eventually turned to his left and pointed to the microphone, while mouthing “Mic.”

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A rallygoer yelled, "Fake news turn it back on!" according to a pool reporter, who indicated the microphone was not controlled by the press. 

When the microphone started working again, the crowd was chanting “Trump.”

“Is the mic ready? Yes,” the president said.

“I wonder who did that to our mic? I don't believe it was Joe. You know who it was? Crooked Hillary. It must've been,” he said, referring to 2016 Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden to name longtime aide Blinken as secretary of State: report Understanding mixed results in Pennsylvania key to future elections What's behind the divisions over Biden's secretary of Labor? MORE.

Trump then continued with his speech.

The president has been traveling and holding rallies as Election Day now looms two weeks away. 

Trump will face Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden to nominate Linda Thomas-Greenfield for UN ambassador: reports Scranton dedicates 'Joe Biden Way' to honor president-elect Kasich: Republicans 'either in complete lockstep' or 'afraid' of Trump MORE, who has taken a different approach by avoiding large gatherings due to the coronavirus pandemic that has infected more than 8.1 million and killed more than 220,000 Americans, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.