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Karl Rove overseeing Republican financial effort to hold Georgia Senate seats

Karl Rove overseeing Republican financial effort to hold Georgia Senate seats
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Karl RoveKarl Christian RoveKarl Rove tears into Michael Flynn, Sidney Powell over election claims The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - Dem leaders back smaller COVID-19 relief bill as pandemic escalates More conservatives break with Trump over election claims MORE, the longtime GOP operative and former adviser to George W. Bush, is heading up Senate Republicans’ fundraising efforts for the Georgia runoff elections. 

Rove has been tapped as the finance chairman for the Georgia Battleground Fund, a joint fundraising effort by the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) and the campaigns of GOP Georgia Sens. David PerdueDavid PerdueNikki Haley unveils PAC ahead of possible 2024 White House bid McConnell has said he thinks Trump committed impeachable offenses: report Trump's legacy is discord and division MORE and Kelly LoefflerKelly LoefflerNikki Haley unveils PAC ahead of possible 2024 White House bid McConnell has said he thinks Trump committed impeachable offenses: report Top Republican congressional aide resigns, rips GOP lawmakers who objected to Biden win MORE, a person familiar with the effort confirmed to The Hill. 

Other veteran GOP operatives involved in the effort include Nick Ayers, a former chief of staff to Vice President Pence, and former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, Politico reported on Monday.

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Republicans and Democrats are expected to pump hundreds of millions of dollars into the two runoffs in Georgia over the next eight weeks as they battle for control of the Senate. The NRSC, the GOP’s Senate campaign arm, announced last week that the Georgia Battleground Fund had raised $32 million over a six-day period

Republicans have so far secured 50 seats in the upper chamber, meaning that Democrats will have to flip both Loeffler’s and Perdue’s seats to win control of the Senate, with Vice President-elect Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisHarris to be sworn in by Justice Sotomayor using Thurgood Marshall's Bible In calling out Trump, Nikki Haley warns of a more sinister threat On The Money: Retail sales drop in latest sign of weakening economy | Fast-food workers strike for minimum wage | US officials raise concerns over Mexico's handling of energy permits MORE breaking the tie. 

Georgia has long been considered safe territory for Republicans; voters there haven’t elected a Democrat to the Senate since 2000. But Democrats have grown increasingly optimistic about their chances in recent years as the state’s rapidly changing demographics and fast-growing population have altered its political landscape.

President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenMissouri woman seen with Pelosi sign charged in connection with Capitol riots Facebook temporarily bans ads for weapons accessories following Capitol riots Sasse, in fiery op-ed, says QAnon is destroying GOP MORE narrowly carried Georgia in the Nov. 3 presidential election, becoming the first Democratic White House hopeful since 1992 to win the state.

Perdue is slated to face Democrat Jon Ossoff in one of the Jan. 5 runoffs. Neither candidate managed to clear the 50 percent threshold needed for an outright win in this month's general election. 

Loeffler, meanwhile, will go head-to-head with Democrat Raphael Warnock, who emerged as the top vote-getter in the Nov. 3 election but still fell short of the 50 percent threshold. Loeffler finished the general election in second place, beating out fellow Republican Rep. Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsDrudge congratulates Warnock, says Ann Coulter should have been GOP candidate Warnock defeats Loeffler in Georgia Senate runoff Warnock says he needs to win 'by comfortable margin' because 'funny things go on' MORE (Ga.).