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Lara Trump mulling 2022 Senate run in North Carolina: report

President TrumpDonald TrumpIran claims U.S. to lift all oil sanctions but State Department says 'nothing is agreed' Ivanka Trump, Kushner distance themselves from Trump claims on election: CNN Overnight Defense: Joint Chiefs chairman clashes with GOP on critical race theory | House bill introduced to overhaul military justice system as sexual assault reform builds momentum MORE’s daughter-in-law, Lara TrumpLara TrumpPast criticism of Trump becomes potent weapon in GOP primaries Trump endorsement shakes up GOP Senate primary in NC Lara Trump calls on Americans at border to 'arm up and get guns and be ready' MORE, could become the next Trump on a ballot as she is reportedly considering a 2022 Senate run in her home state of North Carolina, according to a New York Times report on Thursday. 

Three allies of Lara Trump told the Times that she has been telling associates she could run in two years to replace Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrBill ending federal unemployment supplement passes North Carolina legislature Burr on 'unusual' Trump endorsement in NC Senate race: 'I can't tell you what motivates him' Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting MORE (R-N.C.), who plans to retire at the end of his term.

The upcoming Senate race is likely to be tight after North Carolina became more of a battleground state in this year’s election. President Trump held onto the state by 1.3 percentage points — a smaller margin than in 2016, hinting that the Tar Heel State may be looking more purple.  

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The president’s daughter-in-law, a former personal trainer and television producer for Insider Edition, married Eric TrumpEric TrumpFlorida city bans gambling amid prospects of Trump-owned casino Lara Trump on Senate bid: 'No for now, not no forever' Lara Trump disputes report that father-in-law is discussing reinstalment MORE in 2014.

Mercedes Schlapp, a Trump campaign adviser who traveled with Lara Trump, called her “very charismatic” with “a natural instinct for politics.”

“In North Carolina, in particular, she’s a household name and people know her,” she told the Times. “She worked really hard on the campaign and was very involved in a lot of decisions throughout.”

Political experts have floated the idea that Trump’s children may look to follow the president into politics, but most of the focus has remained on Ivanka TrumpIvanka TrumpIvanka Trump, Kushner distance themselves from Trump claims on election: CNN NYC voters set to decide Vance's replacement amid Trump probe Ukraine sanctions two businessmen tied to Giuliani MORE and Donald Trump Jr.

Former White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayKaren Pence confirms move back to Indiana: 'No place like home' Pence urges 'positive' agenda to counter Biden in first speech since leaving office Kellyanne Conway joins Ohio Senate candidate's campaign MORE told the Times that Lara Trump “would be formidable.”

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“She has the trifecta: She can raise money, raise awareness of key issues and raise attention to her race,” Conway said. “Unlike many typical politicians, she connects with people and is a compelling messenger.”

Lara Trump, who spoke at the Republican National Convention and spoke at several campaign stops, including in North Carolina, this year, declined to comment to the Times about her plans. 

But other North Carolina Republicans are also expected to step up to the plate to target Burr’s seat, including Rep. Mark WalkerBradley (Mark) Mark WalkerTrump's biggest political obstacle is Trump Burr on 'unusual' Trump endorsement in NC Senate race: 'I can't tell you what motivates him' The Hill's Morning Report - Dems to go-it-alone on infrastructure as bipartisan plan falters MORE, whom President Trump has suggested he’d support.

White House chief of staff Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsGOP governors embrace culture wars with White House in mind Tech industry pushes for delay in antitrust legislation Head of firms that pushed 'Italygate' theory falsely claimed VA mansion was her home: report MORE, former Gov. Pat McCrory, North Carolina Speaker Tim Moore and Republican nominee for governor Dan Forest, who lost in 2017 to Gov. Roy Cooper (D), are also expected to throw their hats in the ring, according to the Times.