Biden to campaign in Georgia for Democrats in Senate runoffs

Biden to campaign in Georgia for Democrats in Senate runoffs
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President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden authorizes up to 0M for Afghan refugees Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Biden flexes presidential muscle on campaign trail with Virginia's McAuliffe MORE's campaign said early Thursday that he will travel to Georgia next week to support two Democrats in the state's Senate runoffs.

Biden will campaign on Tuesday in Atlanta on behalf of Jon OssoffJon OssoffObamaCare 2.0 is a big funding deal Senate Democrats call for Medicaid-like plan to cover non-expansion states Stacey Abrams PAC tops 0 million raised MORE and Raphael WarnockRaphael WarnockObamaCare 2.0 is a big funding deal Kaseya ransomware attack highlights cyber vulnerabilities of small businesses Lawmakers spend more on personal security in wake of insurrection MORE, as well as other Democrats in the next month's runoffs.

Additional details were not provided.

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Ossoff is facing off against Sen. David PerdueDavid PerdueLoeffler meets with McConnell amid speculation of another Senate run Georgia agriculture commissioner launches Senate campaign against Warnock Georgia Republican secretary of state hits Loeffler as 'weak,' 'fake Trumper' MORE (R-Ga.) in one of the runoffs on Jan. 5, while Sen. Kelly LoefflerKelly LoefflerSchumer, Tim Scott lead as Senate fundraising pace heats up Trump says Herschel Walker will enter Georgia Senate race WNBA announces zero COVID-19 positive tests, 99 percent fully vaccinated MORE (R-Ga.) is slated to go up against Warnock in the other race. The races were sent to runoffs after neither candidate in either election secured a majority of the vote in November.

If Ossoff and Warnock oust Georgia’s two Republican senators, it would effectively give Democrats a controlling vote in the upper chamber, with Vice President-elect Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisJD Vance takes aim at culture wars, childless politicians Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Ron Johnson: 'I may not be the best candidate' for 2022 midterms MORE casting the tie-breaking vote once she takes office in January.

Otherwise, Republicans and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHas Trump beaten the system? Yellen to Congress: Raise the debt ceiling or risk 'irreparable harm' The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Goldman Sachs - Tokyo Olympics kick off with 2020-style opening ceremony MORE (R-Ky.) would retain control of the Senate, which would likely make achieving the approval of Biden’s Cabinet picks and agenda more difficult.

Republicans are also pulling out all the stops for the Georgia runoff election, sending President TrumpDonald TrumpPoll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Biden flexes presidential muscle on campaign trail with Virginia's McAuliffe Has Trump beaten the system? MORE and Vice President Pence to campaign for the incumbent senators.

Biden’s incoming White House chief of staff, Ron KlainRon KlainWhite House looks to cool battle with Facebook Texas Democrats are fighting harder than Biden or congressional Democrats Biden, Obama 10 minutes apart but rarely together MORE, told NBC News’s “Meet the Press” last month that the president-elect and vice president-elect would campaign in Georgia for the Democratic candidates.

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"It's obviously important to win those seats in Georgia," he said.

If "we have more people who support the kinds of things that Joe Biden supports, I think we're going to have ... a better government," he added.

Except for a trip to Philadelphia on Veterans Day, Biden has not left Delaware since being declared president-elect on Nov. 7.

He became the first Democrat to win the presidential election in Georgia since 1992, although Trump has refused to concede and contested the results by promoting unfounded claims of widespread voter fraud. Republican Georgia elections officials have denied his claims.

National Republicans have expressed concerns that Trump’s challenging of the election's integrity will lead GOP voters to be unmotivated to participate in the runoffs.

Trump's reelection campaign manager, Bill StepienBill Stepien'Just say we won,' Giuliani told Trump aides on election night: book Some RNC staffers did not vote for Trump in 2020, book claims Trump adds veteran organizer to help run political operations: report MORE, said in a statement Thursday morning that Biden's trip to Georgia "proves that Democrats are taking the Senate runoff elections seriously and so should Republicans."

"Perdue and Loeffler have been strong allies for President Trump while their opponents represent everything liberal activists have been screaming about for four years," he added.

— Updated at 9:57 a.m.